Facebook comments for March 30, 2016


An American-Statesman investigation, as reported by Jeremy Schwartz, has revealed that in Texas many migrant housing facilities elude the reach of the state’s limited inspection effort. As a result, an estimated nine in 10 migrant farmworkers lack access to licensed facilities.

Bobby French: Most of the migrant workers are minorities. That is why Texas government does not care.

Amanda Nicole: They deserve to live in appropriate housing – housing that is set up as part of their work.

Beth Menstell: Broken promises exist all over the world for people who are subjugated to poverty.

Ed Mears: I worked on a migrant wheat harvest one summer in high school. Sleeping quarters were a box on wheels that actually slept five of us. We got three to four showers per week. We got paid only when cutting wheat, not when driving trucks and shoveling or working on the combines.

Matt Holdridge: My granddad’s family were migrant workers as kids. Got good jobs and made a life for themselves. Can’t always start out on top.

Palacios Elia: A migrant is not necessarily an illegal immigrant. Some of these workers are U.S. citizens.

Liza Wood: The rich farmer has to get every penny of profit and their even richer politician buddies aren’t going to do anything to punish them.

Regina Ackley: I guess Texas needs its own Cesar Chavez.

Michael Tuttle: Don’t tell me the owner can’t build a simple bunkhouse.

Maria Monhoff: The shame falls on the farm owners who employ them.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Opinion

Author of quiet love story ‘Call Me by Your Name’ to visit BookPeople
Author of quiet love story ‘Call Me by Your Name’ to visit BookPeople

“Call Me by Your Name” is a graceful debut novel by memoirist/literary scholar André Aciman (“False Papers,” 2000,), joining young love to his familiar themes of dislocation and wandering. One could be arrested in certain parts of the world for the young love in question, which joins a 17-year-old bookish musician who...
Commentary: De-escalation training or survival training?
Commentary: De-escalation training or survival training?

The editorial in the Jan. 27 edition of the American-Statesman addressed the recent changes in the Austin Police Department’s policy “that mandates officers to calm volatile situations before reaching for their guns, batons or Tasers.” While this seems like a laudable goal, it fails to recognize some critical elements of survival...
Facebook comments: Feb. 18, 2018
Facebook comments: Feb. 18, 2018

As reported by the American-Statesman’s Ben Wear, although Capital Metro did not intend for it to become public yet, a copy of the proposed Project Connect “high capacity transit system” map emerged on social media. The map has the word “draft” marked in light gray across the various rail and bus lines arrayed across the...
Herman: Downtown public bathroom on the move
Herman: Downtown public bathroom on the move

I think we all understand the concept of any port-a-potty in a storm. We’ve all encountered those internal storms. That’s the very real notion underlying the current test, a joint project of the city of Austin and the Downtown Austin Alliance, of a portable bathroom facility that’s been moved around downtown to see if and where it&rsquo...
Letters to the editor: Feb. 18, 2018
Letters to the editor: Feb. 18, 2018

The United States is dealing with a public health epidemic. This disease is killing children, police officers, and young men and women. In the past, our nation has addressed serious epidemics such as polio, AIDS and lung cancer. First, we gathered valid information. We then studied the origins of these diseases. Ultimately, smoking cessation in the...
More Stories