Facebook comments for March 30, 2016


An American-Statesman investigation, as reported by Jeremy Schwartz, has revealed that in Texas many migrant housing facilities elude the reach of the state’s limited inspection effort. As a result, an estimated nine in 10 migrant farmworkers lack access to licensed facilities.

Bobby French: Most of the migrant workers are minorities. That is why Texas government does not care.

Amanda Nicole: They deserve to live in appropriate housing – housing that is set up as part of their work.

Beth Menstell: Broken promises exist all over the world for people who are subjugated to poverty.

Ed Mears: I worked on a migrant wheat harvest one summer in high school. Sleeping quarters were a box on wheels that actually slept five of us. We got three to four showers per week. We got paid only when cutting wheat, not when driving trucks and shoveling or working on the combines.

Matt Holdridge: My granddad’s family were migrant workers as kids. Got good jobs and made a life for themselves. Can’t always start out on top.

Palacios Elia: A migrant is not necessarily an illegal immigrant. Some of these workers are U.S. citizens.

Liza Wood: The rich farmer has to get every penny of profit and their even richer politician buddies aren’t going to do anything to punish them.

Regina Ackley: I guess Texas needs its own Cesar Chavez.

Michael Tuttle: Don’t tell me the owner can’t build a simple bunkhouse.

Maria Monhoff: The shame falls on the farm owners who employ them.


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