You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myStatesman.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myStatesman.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myStatesman.com.

Washington woman rescues dog that later saves her own life


It’s a story of a warrior and her rescue dog.

>> Read more trending news 

Their story started just five years ago come October.

Self-taught photographer Amanda Tromp, 23, was like so many students when she was in high school.

Tromp was very focused on school and wasn’t really interested in relationships -- until she met her ex-boyfriend one summer.

“He was charming and sweet,” Tromp said. “His sweet talk drew my attention to him and after chatting we ended up dating.”

Everything started out normal. Going on dates, hanging out with friends, watching movies -- when suddenly things took a turn for the worse.

Tromp’s ex-boyfriend became extremely controlling and wanted to know who she was talking with at all times. He would question her when she went to work or even when she went home to visit her parents.

His controlling behavior spiraled out of control and turned into emotional abuse.

“He would insult me anytime he was upset or jealous,” Tromp explained. “Calling me fat, ugly, stupid and a variety of profanities I am uncomfortable sharing here.”

>>Photos: Breathtaking images from self-taught photographer Amanda with her dog, Kyro

She lost ties with friends and family, which made it extremely difficult to leave because she felt like she had no one to turn to.

“I felt alone and that no one would understand what I was going through,” Tromp said

Then, something truly life-changing happened.

While on her computer, Tromp stumbled across an ad of a woman who was in desperate need for assistance in taking care of some Siberian Husky puppies and finding them good homes.

The litter was unexpected and the owner was young, and feeling extremely overwhelmed in this situation.

After helping care for the puppies, Tromp immediately fell in love with the chunkiest of them all, Kyro.

Tromp decided to rescue him, but what she didn’t know is that Kyro would be the one who ended up saving her.

Soon after taking Kyro home, her ex-boyfriend’s behavior turned toward him.

He started to hit him -- and that’s when something inside Tromp snapped.

Kyro had grown into her world and was helping her regain her confidence.

“A fire I hadn't felt in a year exploded inside of me and I left,” Tromp said.

Her desire to protect Kyro from him was more powerful than the fear she had of what he would do when she left.

When Tromp decided to leave her abusive relationship behind, everything changed.

“Goldilocks and the Wolf” became their nickname and Tromp’s photographer business name. The nickname was born from Tromp’s mother, who had given the name the day she brought Kyro home.

“It became something empowering to me and extremely meaningful to me,” Tromp said.

Kyro's name is short for "Kyrös," which stems from a story Tromp’s great grandfather used to tell her. A story about Kyrös the blue-eyed dragon, keeper of space and time. The shortened version "Kyro" means the bringer of opportunities.

Tromp decided she would combine her nickname with her gifts of photography to share her story of domestic violence, hoping to smash how taboo the topic seemed to be.

It is now flourishing online, with 261,000 followers on Instagram, who are all routinely wowed by her breathtaking snaps of Kyro out on his adventures.

Women and men alike started to reach out to Tromp with stories of their own, expressing their fear of sharing their stories and being judged, or labeled weak.

So many stories reminded Tromp of her own and she said that despite some of the negative comments from people online saying being in an abusive relationship was "weak" and "cowardly,” Tromp continued to share.

“You aren't a coward for not being able to leave,” Tromp said. “You are a victim in something that society does not understand and turns a blind eye to because they don't want to accept it as a problem.”

The biggest reason Tromp decided to share her story is to let people know that they are not alone, nor are they weak.

“You can find happiness again, you can rebuild,” Tromp said.

The two things that Tromp said she wished she’d heard when she was in that relationship were, "You are not alone" and "I believe you."

If you are reading this and are going through something similar, or know someone who is, remember this:

"Don't forget that you aren't alone," Tromp said. "That there are others out there that have been through, or are going through what you are. Don't give up hope. Hope is an incredible thing and can move mountains."


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Nation & World

What was that glowing orb Trump touched in Saudi Arabia?
What was that glowing orb Trump touched in Saudi Arabia?

A mysterious glowing orb is exerting uncanny power over the world’s social media.   President Donald Trump, King Salman of Saudi Arabia and President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi of Egypt entered a darkened room filled with row after row of computers in Riyadh, the Saudi capital, on Sunday evening.   They placed their hands atop...
Lawyers are the big winners in the 2016 election interference investigation
Lawyers are the big winners in the 2016 election interference investigation

The appointment of Robert S. Mueller III as special counsel to oversee the Justice Department’s investigation of possible Russian involvement in the 2016 election means that White House staff members and others connected to President Donald Trump’s presidential campaign will need to do one thing quickly: Lawyer up.  The investigation...
Fentanyl disguised as OxyContin in drug bust
Fentanyl disguised as OxyContin in drug bust

A November traffic stop on Interstate 77 in North Carolina's Iredell County turned into a drug bust. That drug bust was considered the biggest OxyContin bust in the county’s history. But WSOC-TV anchor Allison Latos has learned that the drugs seized in the bust turned out to be fentanyl, which is up to 100 times more powerful than heroin...
Ariana Grande says she's 'broken' over deadly explosion after Manchester concert
Ariana Grande says she's 'broken' over deadly explosion after Manchester concert

Ariana Grande took to social media Monday night to express her sorrow over a deadly explosion that killed at least 22 people – including children – and injured 59 after her concert at England's Manchester Arena. "Broken," tweeted the pop star, who was not hurt in the incident. "From the bottom of my heart, I am so so...
Manchester explosion: Here’s what we know about the victims
Manchester explosion: Here’s what we know about the victims

Authorities continue  to sort out what happened Monday night when a man who police believe was a suicide bomber detonated an explosive device outside an arena in Manchester, England. The explosion happened moments after the conclusion of a concert by pop star Ariana Grande. At least 22 have been confirmed dead and 59 injured as of 2...
More Stories