You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myStatesman.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myStatesman.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myStatesman.com.

Investigators taking closer look at Aaron Hernandez's final hours


The Massachusetts Department of Corrections said state police will investigate what it called the apparent suicide of former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez, but others are promising to take a closer look into what happened.

>> Read more trending news

The question of why Hernandez would end his own life might go unanswered.

It was just after 3 a.m. Wednesday when corrections officers found Hernandez hanging from a bed sheet.

No suicide note was left, but sources told Fox25Boston that “John 3:16” was written on his forehead and the wall of his prison cell.

The Bible passage reads:

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life.”

State police spent the day gathering evidence from the cell, reviewing surveillance video and speaking with prison staff.

>> Related: Aaron Hernandez's lawyer, agent dispute suicide claims, want full investigation

Officials said Wednesday that there was no indication that Hernandez was suicidal.

“It’s possible it might not be a suicide, but there are people committing suicide in this facility,” State Sen. Jamie Eldridge said. “(There are) five, six, seven people every few years.”

According to the Boston Globe, Hernandez is the 27th suicide in Massachusetts state prisons since 2010, and the second so far this year.

Another person promising to investigate Hernandez’s apparent suicide is his high-profile attorney, Jose Baez. He recently won an acquittal for Hernandez in his double murder trial.

In a statement, Baez writes:

“We are heartbroken and we are determined to find the truth. We are looking into the process and will conduct a transparent investigation into his untimely death.”

The Globe reports that an official told it that corrections officers conduct nighttime bed checks once an hour and on a staggered schedule to increase the chance of locating an inmate who may have an issue.

“I really hope Gov. (Charlie) Baker and the Legislature take a hard look at improving conditions for prisoners and corrections officers,” Eldridge said.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Nation & World

Investigators hope new technology will help solve 20-year-old murder
Investigators hope new technology will help solve 20-year-old murder

Investigators are working to solve the 20-year-old murder of a woman killed in her home. Lorrie Smith, 28, was found dead of a gunshot wound at her home on Stonewall Tell Road on May 25, 1997. Her father said he found her body when he went to wake her up for church. “I opened the door and there she was in her blood on the floor. I thought that...
Disney fireworks: Vehicles covered in ashes, residents say
Disney fireworks: Vehicles covered in ashes, residents say

The "Happily Ever After" fireworks show happens every night at Disney’s Magic Kingdom. However, residents around the park told WFTV’s Jeff Deal that the fireworks are dropping a mess all over their cars and yards. Ashes and small pieces of card board are falling on vehicles and yards at the Windermere Cay Luxury ...
Will Georgia's 6th District do this all again in 2018?
Will Georgia's 6th District do this all again in 2018?

Despite initial relief among Georgia's 6th District residents that the barrage of campaign ads has come to an end, the reprieve might not last too long. "Now we know what New Hampshire looks like," said Chip Lake, a GOP consultant based in Georgia. The question is, with 2018 just around the corner, will this year's astronomical spending,...
Opioids, a mass killer we’re meeting with a shrug
Opioids, a mass killer we’re meeting with a shrug

About as many Americans are expected to die this year of drug overdoses as died in the Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan wars combined. For more than 100 years, death rates have been dropping for Americans — but now, because of opioids, death rates are rising again. We as a nation are going backward, and drug overdoses are now the leading cause of...
Fuel demand slump may have link to US immigrant crackdown
Fuel demand slump may have link to US immigrant crackdown

At this time of year, demand for gasoline in the U.S. is normally rising as people head out for summer vacations in a country that has millions more vehicles than any other. But that's not happening in 2017, and one contributing factor could be that undocumented immigrants are driving less. Part of the blame for the slowdown may be higher pump prices...
More Stories