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Cancer risk: Colorectal cancer rates rising for millennials


Startling results are coming to light that more millennials are being diagnosed with colorectal cancer in recent years, and it has medical professionals worried.

Most cases of colorectal cancer are still being diagnosed in people over the age of 50.

But for those under the age of 50, the rate of diagnosis is increasing, The New York Times reported.

The American Cancer Society said there will be approximately 13,500 cases diagnosed for people under 50 this year, but there will be more than 95,500 cases of colon cancer across all age groups and 40,000 cases of rectal cancer.

But what has experts on edge is that for people born in 1990, the risk of colon cancer is five per million people in that age group could develop the cancer. That's up from three per million for those born in 1950. The number for rectal cancer is four per million for those born in 1990. It's .9 per million for people born 40 years earlier.

In addition to the risk of cancer itself, younger patients can be diagnosed after the disease progresses. Doctors, according to the New York Times, don't think that younger patients are at risk of colorectal cancers since it is usually a disease of aging.

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

Read more on the study here.


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