Mayor: Bathroom bill may cause Round Rock to lose Quidditch tournament


Highlights

Organizers of Quidditch tournament said they wanted to see what happens with bathroom bill, mayor said

Bathroom bill would limit transgender Texans to using bathrooms that correspond to their birth certificate

It’s not quite time to get out the broomsticks in Round Rock. A national quidditch tournament headed to town next year has been put on hold while legislators consider the bathroom bill during their special session, said Round Rock Mayor Craig Morgan.

RELATED: Harry Potter fans rejoice: Round Rock hosting U.S. cup in 2018

U.S. Quidditch recently told the city that it wasn’t going to sign a contract to come to Round Rock until it finds out what happens with the bathroom bill, Morgan said. He said he couldn’t provide further details.

The city announced in early July that the U.S. Quidditch Cup 11 would April 14-15, 2018, at the Round Rock Multipurpose Complex.

Quidditch is a real-world adaptation of the game played by Harry Potter and his friends in the book series created by J.K. Rowling. The sport can be described as a cross between rugby, basketball and dodge ball, while players “fly” on broomsticks.

If the city starts losing big tournaments because of the bathroom bill, Morgan said, it could have an effect on taxpayers who voted to allocate a half-cent of the sales tax for property tax relief.

“If events start leaving I think we will have to increase taxes or cut services if it becomes a big enough impact,” said Morgan.

The bathroom bill expected to be revived in the special session would require transgender Texans to use bathrooms that correspond to their birth-certificate gender.

RELATED: Special session revives racial tensions, “bathroom bill.”

Some of the nation’s most-powerful businesses, from Apple to the NFL, have opposed the bill. Republican House Speaker Joe Straus says it’s bad for business.

Supporters of the bathroom bill — including Gov. Greg Abbott and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, both Republicans — say the legislation is needed to protect women and girls from men who could prey upon them in women’s bathrooms.

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