Sheriff uses game show-style ‘Wheel of Fugitives’ to catch criminals


The Brevard County Sheriff’s office in central Florida is putting an unusual spin on the agency’s search for wanted criminals.

Using a game modeled on the big wheel in the long-running game show “Wheel of Fortune,” the office posts Facebook videos of its own version of the game called “Wheel of Fugitives.”

>> Read more trending news  

“It’s time for ‘Wheel of Fugitives,’ the game that fugitives hate and citizens love,” the department posted on its Facebook page to alert users that the game is about to begin.

Sheriff Wayne Ivey, the game’s version of Pat Sajak, said during interviews on the unusual law enforcement tool that officers have been using the game for the past 18 months to find and arrest many fugitives.

Florida sheriff spins the "Wheel of Fugitive" to fight crime!

Posted by Fox & Friends on Wednesday, March 15, 2017

“When we put someone up on the ‘Wheel of Fugitive,’ our citizens start sending us messages and contacting us right away,” Ivey said in an interview with CBS News.

Here’s how it works. Ivey spins a wheel with the pictures of 10 wanted criminals attached to it. Whichever photo the wheel lands on is declared the unlucky “winner” and is the person the department will search for with help from all the Facebook users who watch the video.

Ivey said the game has helped catch dozens of wanted felons.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

DOWNTOWN GARAGE SUED: Woman files lawsuit after car’s 7-story fall last month 
DOWNTOWN GARAGE SUED: Woman files lawsuit after car’s 7-story fall last month 

The woman whose car plummeted from the seventh floor of a downtown parking garage last month has sued the garage’s owner and its management, alleging they were negligent by not upgrading a cable barrier system that failed to keep the car from going over the edge of the building. Cedar Park resident Christi Bowmer, 49, is asking for more than...
Police union: Officers still suffering from carbon monoxide effects

Three Austin police officers are suffering long-term effects from carbon monoxide poisoning that they believe came from their police vehicles, according to the Austin Police Department’s union president. “This whole thing has been a disaster from the beginning,” said Ken Casaday, president of the Austin Police Association. &ldquo...
Police union: Officers still suffering from carbon monoxide effects
Police union: Officers still suffering from carbon monoxide effects

Three Austin police officers are suffering long-term effects from carbon monoxide poisoning that they believe came from their police vehicles, according to the Austin Police Department’s union president. “This whole thing has been a disaster from the beginning,” said Ken Casaday, president of the Austin Police Association. &ldquo...
Central Health budget hearing sparks debate over medical school funds
Central Health budget hearing sparks debate over medical school funds

About an hour into a discussion on Central Health’s budget that became a debate over the health district’s relationship with University of Texas’ Dell Medical School, Travis County Commissioner Gerald Daugherty announced he was fed up. “I have sat through two, three years of this stuff, and I’m, quite frankly, I&rsquo...
Bee Cave City Council parses budget
Bee Cave City Council parses budget

The Bee Cave City Council met briefly on Aug. 22 to nail down a budget for the 2017-2018 fiscal year with few drastic changes. Council focused on road maintenance and police department expenses. City Manager Travis Askey showed the council a chart demonstrating costs for each of the city’s departments over the past five years. The police department...
More Stories