Are you a Brack Baby? Send us your pictures and stories

As Brackenridge closes and patients move to the new teaching hospital, we remember the infants.


On May 21, patients will move ceremoniously from University Medical Center Brackenridge by ambulance across East 15th Street to the state-of-the-science Dell Seton Medical Center at the University of Texas.

Meanwhile, we are gathering historical notes on Brack — first opened in 1884 — assembling a timeline, making a video, creating an interactive map and, most fun of all, putting together a gallery of Brack baby pictures. We want to hear from you at mbarnes@statesman.com.

Suzanne Geiger’s daughter Liesl was born at Brack in Dec. 15, 2005.

“I was admitted to the hospital very unexpectedly at 28 weeks with pre-eclampsia,” Geiger wrote us. “I wasn’t planning on delivering at Brackenridge, but circumstances necessitated it because it was known early on that, in addition to my sickness with pregnancy, which resulted in an early emergency C-section, our daughter had a congenital issue with the formation of her sternum that would’ve required neonatal surgery even in the best of circumstances.”

After delivery, Liesl lived for two months in the neonatal intensive care unit at Brack’s children’s hospital.

“Brackenridge quickly became a second home for us, and it was in no small part thanks to the dedication of the amazing NICU nurses and doctors who took care of our needy baby — and in the process took great care of us, her parents,” Geiger wrote. “I cried terribly on the day that we got to — had to! – leave the NICU and take our baby home for the first time.”

Eleven years later, the family is still dear friends with Ellen Trachtman, one of the nurses who took care of Liesl.

“She became so integral to our life then that we adopted her into our circle,” Geiger wrote. “She worked at Brack for a long time, and I think she is among a dying breed of health providers who worked in medical care before medical care was a big business. Brackenridge was all heart, and that was evident after spending any time within its tiled halls.”



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