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Stephen Colbert’s Alex Jones impression is on point


Alex Jones has Stephen Colbert’s heart feeling like a volcano.

We know the president of the United States pays attention to Austin’s most famous conspiracy theorist. Now we know he’s on the radar of late night TV, too. Inspired by Jones, “Late Show” host Colbert on Monday night dipped his toes back into the familiar waters of right-wing caricature. If the Infowars host’s on-air persona is “performance art,” an argument his attorneys are making in a Travis County child custody case first reported on by the American-Statesman, then Colbert has more in common with him than you might think. After all, Colbert played a parody of conservative pundits like Bill O’Reilly for 9 years on Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.”

READ MORE: On the eve of his own child custody trial, Alex Jones suggests Obama’s daughters aren’t his own

Except that’s not exactly where Colbert took things. In a parody segment called “Brain Fight with Tuck Buckford,” the comedian debuted an impression of Jones that’s good enough to make you feel like “a skeleton wrapped in angry meat.” Watch it on YouTube.

“The liberals want to tattoo Obama logos onto the skin of Christian babies, OK?” Colbert-as-Buckford proclaims. We’ll let you decide if that’s just as outlandish as some of Jones’ claims, like the supposed planned federal takeover of Texas through the Jade Helm 15 military training exercise in Bastrop. In more inflammatory moments, Jones has spread false reports that the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre was a hoax and that a child sex trafficking ring was being run through a real Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant.

Follow the Statesman’s live coverage of the second day of Jones’ custody trial.

[h/t Esquire]

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