Stephen Colbert’s Alex Jones impression is on point


Alex Jones has Stephen Colbert’s heart feeling like a volcano.

We know the president of the United States pays attention to Austin’s most famous conspiracy theorist. Now we know he’s on the radar of late night TV, too. Inspired by Jones, “Late Show” host Colbert on Monday night dipped his toes back into the familiar waters of right-wing caricature. If the Infowars host’s on-air persona is “performance art,” an argument his attorneys are making in a Travis County child custody case first reported on by the American-Statesman, then Colbert has more in common with him than you might think. After all, Colbert played a parody of conservative pundits like Bill O’Reilly for 9 years on Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.”

READ MORE: On the eve of his own child custody trial, Alex Jones suggests Obama’s daughters aren’t his own

Except that’s not exactly where Colbert took things. In a parody segment called “Brain Fight with Tuck Buckford,” the comedian debuted an impression of Jones that’s good enough to make you feel like “a skeleton wrapped in angry meat.” Watch it on YouTube.

]]>

“The liberals want to tattoo Obama logos onto the skin of Christian babies, OK?” Colbert-as-Buckford proclaims. We’ll let you decide if that’s just as outlandish as some of Jones’ claims, like the supposed planned federal takeover of Texas through the Jade Helm 15 military training exercise in Bastrop. In more inflammatory moments, Jones has spread false reports that the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre was a hoax and that a child sex trafficking ring was being run through a real Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant.

Follow the Statesman’s live coverage of the second day of Jones’ custody trial.

[h/t Esquire]

IN OTHER NEWS:


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Movies & TV

Sending relief by air and sea to Puerto Rico from the Bronx
Sending relief by air and sea to Puerto Rico from the Bronx

The pleas for help, arriving in text messages and on Facebook, have not relented, filling Lymaris Albors’ phone since the hurricane that roared across Puerto Rico, her homeland. The people on the other end were asking for all sorts of things: food, generators, solar lights, tarpaulins to take the place of roofs shredded by the hurricane. As she...
The free meal, long gone, returns on some airlines
The free meal, long gone, returns on some airlines

It seemed to be extinct. The airlines stopped offering it on domestic flights more than a decade ago, along with other amenities that once made air travel an adventure rather than an endurance test. And yet it has reappeared in recent months: a free meal in coach. Continuing their emergence from hard economic times, some airlines have begun adding...
Roasted garlic lends depth of flavor to a simple soup
Roasted garlic lends depth of flavor to a simple soup

Does everyone know about the glorious versatility of roasted garlic? I hope so. But just in case you don't, the next time you've got your oven going for at least the better part of an hour, roast some and you'll see. Just take a whole head of garlic, cut it in half horizontally, so you get through all the cloves, drizzle each half with olive oil, wrap...
One man’s meatloaf is another man’s poison
One man’s meatloaf is another man’s poison

I thought I made it clear. I don’t like meatloaf. In my very first column for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch nearly four years ago, I wrote that I will try almost anything “except meatloaf. That is the one food I will not eat.”  As it turns out, I am not alone in this perfectly understandable and even admirable trait. Our esteemed...
A mushroom out of a fairy tale that you might find in the forest
A mushroom out of a fairy tale that you might find in the forest

The fly agaric is the quintessential mushroom of fairy tales. Its big, bright fruiting bodies scatter in great numbers across mossy forests of North America and Europe. They emerge from the soil first like white eggs, abandoned by some mysterious creature of the woods. They can grow up to a foot tall, as warts appear on the cap. The mushroom often...
More Stories