Buying toys for Christmas? Make sure they are safe


In the 1983 Christmas movie “A Christmas Story,” everyone warns Ralphie, “You’ll shoot your eye out,” when he asks for a Red Ryder BB gun. When he wakes up on Christmas morning and he is given a Red Ryder BB gun from Santa, what happens? He shoots his eye out … well, not really, but he does injure himself and break his glasses.

Want to avoid that this Christmas morning or Hanukkah night? The American Academy of Pediatrics offer these tips:

Make sure the toy is age-appropriate and fits the child’s abilities. Can they play with the toy by themselves?

Choose toys that work on building skills such as fine motor skills and cognitive abilities.

Read warning labels on the toy and the age level that is on the box.

Make sure all toys say “nontoxic.”

Make sure all electronic toys say “UL Certified.” The UL is a company that evaluates products for safety, including for choking hazards and toxicity.

Check for recalls with the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Show your child how to use the toy the right way.

Take off tags and strings before giving a toy to a child.

Avoid toys that are too loud and could affect a child’s hearing. If they really want that toy, disable the sound mechanism if you can or remove the batteries.

Prevent choking by making sure all toys and their parts are larger than your child’s mouth. Children younger than age 3 cannot have parts less than 1 1/4 inches in diameter and 2 1/4 inches long.

Avoid toys that shoot objects in the air. Remember: “You’ll shoot your eye out.”

Be cautious about toys containing button batteries or magnets. Kids eat them, and they can cause stomach and intestinal problems, or even death.

Children younger than age 10 should not be given toys that need to be plugged in. Instead choose toys with batteries that have a battery case that they cannot get into.

Make sure stuffed toys are well-made: The seams and edges are secure, there are no loose ribbons or seams, and stuffing is not small beanlike pellets. It also should be machine washable.

Make sure toys with pull-strings do not have strings longer than 12 inches.

Do not give broken or uninflated balloons to children younger than age 8. They are a choking hazard.

Make sure plastic toys are sturdy and not made of thin plastic that will break easily.

Skip the hobby kits and chemistry sets for children younger than 12 years old. Do you want your 5-year-old around chemicals and things that can set the house on fire?

Skip the crib toys. All crib toys need to be removed from the crib as soon as your baby can push up on his hands and knees or is 5 months old.

Store toys in a designated location and by age. Make sure younger kids cannot get into the older kids’ toys.

Avoid toy boxes with lids that lock or a lid that is heavy. Use an open bin or open shelves in a bookcase that is anchored to the wall. If you use a box, make sure the box has ventilation holes.

If you’re thinking about giving screens to kids, follow these new guidelines:

  • Children younger than 18 months of age: Avoid the use of any screen media except video chatting (with grandparents, for example).
  • Children ages 18 months to 24 months: Introduce high-quality programs or apps, but do it with your children to create a dialogue about what they are seeing and how it relates to the world around them.
  • Children ages 2 to 5 years: Limit screen time to one hour a day of high-quality programs that you view with them.
  • Children ages 6 and older: Place consistent limits on time spent using media and the types of media, and make sure that the use of media does not take the place of sleeping, exercise and other healthy behaviors.
  • Designate media-free times together, such as during dinner or while driving, as well as media-free locations at home, such as bedrooms.
  • Have ongoing conversations about what it means to be a good citizen and be safe online and offline.

Find more tips at healthychildren.org.



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