American Academy of Pediatrics wants doctors to discuss sex with teens

12:00 a.m. Friday, Oct. 27, 2017 Lifestyle
University of Miami pediatrician Judith L. Schaechter gives an HPV vaccination to a 13-year-old girl in her office. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends its doctors have a conversation about sex and sexuality with their teen patients. Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A new recommendation — Sexual and Reproductive Health Care Services in the Pediatric Setting — from the Committee on Adolescence at the American Academy of Pediatrics, reminds pediatricians how important they are in the sexual health of their teen patients.

It makes the case by giving these statistics:

And it reminds them they they have opportunities in those pediatric well checks to talk about:

They also can facilitate a discussion between parent and child about sex, but the academy also recommends pediatricians have the opportunity to talk confidentially to the child about sex when the parent is not in the room. It recommends starting to have these confidential talks without parents in the room beginning with the 11-year-old well-check.

The study also looked at what pediatricians are currently doing and found:

Those 36 seconds probably don’t cover much. Imagine if you’re a teen who doesn’t feel comfortable talking to your parent or your parent doesn’t feel comfortable talking to you. Where are you supposed to get your information? Probably not in school, though there is some talk of sexually transmitted diseases in health class or science class, but it’s not much.

In the locker room? In the cafeteria at lunch? Where? And if you’re getting it from your friends who are getting it from their friends, how accurate is all of it?

But if your doctor gives you information, more than just a handout, and let’s you ask questions, wouldn’t that be better information for you?

Cookie Monster getting his own food truck

The next season of “Sesame Street” begins Nov. 11 on HBO, followed by a spring debut on PBS. What’s new for the season? Definitely more kindness episodes, more episodes talking about differences and recognizing that people can be different because of race, ethnicity, economics, abilities and more. Last season, “Sesame Street” introduced Julia, a muppet with autism.

New this season, Cookie Monster is getting his own food truck (How very Austin of him!). In his food truck, he’ll head to find where ingredients come from. (Yes, eat local!) For example, in the opening episode, he needs apples, so he heads to an apple orchard. Throughout the season he’ll investigate where cranberries, avocados, tortillas, pineapples, maple syrup, pasta and milk come from.

We look forward to finding out ourselves.

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