Time to submit your recipes for the Austin360 Holiday Cookie Contest


Gingersnaps and sugar cookies and snickerdoodles, oh my! To celebrate the end of our Year of Baking series, we’re bringing back a holiday cookie contest.

It’s been seven years since we last hosted one (and 16 years since the epic Christmas Cookin’ Contest ended), and that’s far too long to go without what feels like a community cookie swap of sorts. I’m always amazed at how the stories behind these cookies really help carry them, and just how creative you all get with one of our most beloved holiday traditions.

We often make the same cookies year after year, adding new ones to the rotation only if they impress us at a holiday party or from a tin that a neighbor dropped off. Some cookies matter because they mattered to our grandmothers. Other cookies matter because they remind us of when our children were young or because they bring a smile to the faces of our coworkers.

To celebrate these treasures, we are asking readers to submit their favorite cookie recipes and their best decorated cookies. That’s right, we’re going to have two categories this year: taste and decoration. On austin360.com/cookiecontest, you can submit your best cookie recipe or a photo of your best decorated cookie.

We know that recipe origin can be a tricky thing, but we ask that you submit original recipes or recipes that you have adapted in some way. If you don’t know where your recipe came from, say so, and share the original source if you do.

As for the decorated cookie submissions, a cellphone photo is all we need, but do place your cookie in good lighting so we can see the detail. Keep those decorated cookies in an airtight container or be prepared to make them again if you’re a finalist. On Nov. 17, we’ll have both the taste and decoration finalists come to the Statesman for a photo shoot.

We are keeping the taste competition limited to home cooks, but professionals are welcome to enter the decorated category.

The deadline to enter both categories is Nov. 2, and we’ll pick our finalists by Nov. 11. Look for the finalist and winning recipes and cookies in our December food sections. If you have any questions, email me at abroyles@statesman.com or call 512-912-2504.


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