Recipe of the Week: Hubbard Squash with Parmesan and Brown Butter


This time of year, you can find all kinds of squash and gourds at local grocery stores, far more than the variety found just 10 or 15 years ago. Hubbard squash is one that you might have decorated with but never cooked.

In last week’s food section, we shared a handful of squash recipes that you could use with pumpkins or other edible gourds, and this recipe is similarly versatile. You could use butternut or acorn squash instead of Hubbard; all of them pair well with the Parmesan and brown butter.

Hubbard Squash with Parmesan and Brown Butter

I can’t think of much that wouldn’t be good with Parmesan and brown butter, actually, but the combination is especially good with roasted winter squash. Use leftovers for a baked pasta — layer the squash with rigatoni or penne cooked firmly al dente, and then shower with grated cheese and bread crumbs.

— David Tanis

2 pounds peeled Hubbard or other winter squash, cut into 1/2-inch slices or a bit thinner

Salt and pepper

Olive oil

3 tablespoons butter

Pinch of crushed red pepper

12 large sage leaves, roughly chopped, or a handful of smaller sage leaves

Arugula or chopped parsley for garnish

A chunk of Parmesan for shaving

Lemon wedges

Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Put the squash slices in a large bowl, season with salt and black pepper, and drizzle with enough olive oil to coat. Toss the squash with your hands to distribute the seasoning, then transfer to two baking sheets and spread out the slices. Roast until the squash is cooked through and the edges are browned here and there, about 15 minutes. (You can roast the squash up to 3 hours in advance and hold it at room temperature.)

Arrange the squash on a warm platter or on individual plates, then quickly make the brown butter sauce: Melt the butter in a small skillet over medium-high heat. Add the crushed red pepper and sage, season with a little salt and black pepper, and whisk the butter and aromatics as the butter begins to bubble and brown. When the butter is foamy and nutty-smelling, in a minute or so, spoon it over the squash. Garnish with a few arugula leaves or chopped parsley and use a sharp vegetable peeler to shave Parmesan over the squash. Serve with lemon wedges.

Makes 6 to 8 servings as a main course, 10 servings as an appetizer.

— From “David Tanis Market Cooking: Recipes and Revelations, Ingredient by Ingredient” by David Tanis (Artisan, $40) Evan Sung



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Austin360 Eats

It’s not all about the turkey: 9 things you probably didn't know about Thanksgiving
It’s not all about the turkey: 9 things you probably didn't know about Thanksgiving

Each year, Thanksgiving comes around with with the giddy anticipation of devoruing comfort food and spending some QT with loved ones, which reminds you just what what you are thankful for the most. The rich, deep history of this centuries-old tradition is woven into the United States' cultural fabric, yet, there are still many aspects of the holiday...
Macy’s Day Parade 2017: 5 things to know about the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade
Macy’s Day Parade 2017: 5 things to know about the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

There are a number of things associated with Thanksgiving− turkey, pilgrims, big dinners and family. One of them is the tradition of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Since 1924, Macy's has helped thousands of families celebrate the holidays with its annual parade.  The parade steps off at 9 a.m. sharp from 77th Street and Central Park...
Straight from frozen: A rock-solid plan for your rock-solid Thanksgiving bird
Straight from frozen: A rock-solid plan for your rock-solid Thanksgiving bird

When producing a Thanksgiving meal becomes a last-minute affair - and there are plenty of reasons that happens, no judging - you might think getting a bronzed bird on the table presents the toughest challenge.  Nah, you've got this. Cooking a whole turkey from a rock-solid, frozen state can yield respectable results. If you stick it in the oven...
This comfort food leads a double life, but only some of us know the secret.
This comfort food leads a double life, but only some of us know the secret.

It was one of those volunteer duties, the one where you agree to talk to your kid’s class about your job. I figured it would be easy: I’d ask the kids what their family eats at Thanksgiving and we’d do a middle-school version of Brillat-Savarin’s old saw, “Tell me what you eat and I’ll tell you who you are.&rdquo...
Asian-American chefs are changing our palate
Asian-American chefs are changing our palate

As an Asian-American born in Los Angeles and raised in Honolulu, I’ve thought a lot about what it means to grow up in multiple cultures at once — my Filipino mother’s, my British father’s, and my America. For a recent piece on how Asian-American chefs are changing the American palate, I spoke with some two dozen chefs and restaurateurs...
More Stories