You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myStatesman.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myStatesman.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myStatesman.com.

Recipe of the week: Goat cheese basil gnocchi, made with pâte à choux


Don’t let the length of this recipe deter you — this is a relatively simple approach to gnocchi using basic, readily available ingredients, but it does call for making a pâte à choux.

That’s the same dough that adds airiness to profiteroles and cream puffs, which we tackled during last year’s Year of Baking series. You can find the video and tutorial on pâte à choux at austin360.com/yearofbaking.

The recipe author, Bryan Calvert, serves the gnocchi with summer squash and basil in his book, “Brooklyn Rustic: Simple Food for Sophisticated Palates” (Little, Brown and Company, $30), but you could make them with any gently cooked seasonal vegetable.

Goat Cheese Basil Gnocchi

Fine sea salt

1 1/2 sticks (12 Tbsp.) unsalted butter

2 cups all-purpose flour

12 oz. goat cheese

5 large eggs

3 Tbsp. finely sliced fresh basil

Freshly ground black pepper

1 Tbsp. vegetable oil, plus more if needed

1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

1 garlic clove, minced

Bring 6 quarts water and 1 teaspoon salt to a simmer in a large pot.

In a medium pot, bring 1 1/2 cups water, the butter and 1 teaspoon salt to a boil. Add the flour, reduce the heat to low, and stir with a wooden spoon for about 2 minutes, until the mixture becomes a smooth dough and doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot.

Remove the pot of dough from the heat and stir in 8 ounces of the goat cheese. Crack the eggs in one at a time, beating each one into the dough before adding the next. The batter should be sticky. Stir in the finely sliced basil and two turns of black pepper. Transfer one-quarter of the batter to a pastry bag with a #5 tip (7/16-inch), or a gallon-size zipper-lock bag with 1/2-inch cut off one corner.

Hold the bag over the pot of simmering water and squeeze the batter out in 1/2-inch cylinder dumplings, cutting them with a paring knife so they fall into the water. Simmer for 4 minutes. Once all gnocchi have floated to the top, cook for 2 more minutes. Remove the gnocchi from the water with a slotted spoon and transfer to a paper towel–lined baking sheet to remove any excess water.

Repeat with the remaining dough in three more batches. Once cooled, the gnocchi can be used immediately, or refrigerated for up to 2 days.

When ready to cook, heat the vegetable oil in a large nonstick sauté pan over high heat. Working in batches, add as many gnocchi to the pan as will fit in one layer without overcrowding. Brown the gnocchi for 3 to 4 minutes on each side. Transfer to a plate. Brown the remaining gnocchi, adding another tablespoon of vegetable oil to the pan in between batches, if needed.

Carefully wipe out any remaining vegetable oil from the pan with a paper towel. Heat the olive oil over medium heat. If you’d like to quickly saute some vegetables, such as winter greens or summer squash, do so now. To the hot pan or the just-cooked vegetables, add the garlic and cook for 1 minute without browning. Add 1/4 cup water and the gnocchi. Heat through, scraping the bottom of the pan. Transfer to a warm serving dish and sprinkle the remaining goat cheese on top. Garnish with whole basil leaves, if desired, and a couple of turns of black pepper. Serve immediately. Serves 4.

— From “Brooklyn Rustic: Simple Food for Sophisticated Palates” by Bryan Calvert (Little, Brown and Company, $30)



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Austin360 Eats

Could Smashing Pumpkins be reuniting for tour?
Could Smashing Pumpkins be reuniting for tour?

Could the original members of Smashing Pumpkins be making plans to reunite? Some fans believe comments made by the band’s original drummer are signaling that the group is getting back together. Smashing Pumpkins’ original drummer, Jimmy Chamberlin, said during an interview with WGN Radio that he’s going to record with “people...
The secret to a great potluck? It’s not the food
The secret to a great potluck? It’s not the food

The most elaborate potluck I ever went to was my own wedding, to which each guest brought a dish in lieu of gifts. We feasted on truffled pea soup and caviar tea sandwiches. At the other end of the potluck spectrum was my daughter’s second-grade graduation breakfast, a festive hodgepodge of child-made scones, store-bought red velvet doughnuts...
Why it's so hard to figure out when bottled and canned beer is fresh
Why it's so hard to figure out when bottled and canned beer is fresh

Before craft beer aficionado Matthew Starr buys a new IPA or Pilsener at his favorite beer store, he picks up the can to check for a date. "I will look for a date code 100 percent of the time," the 35-year-old Washington attorney said. "I've had too many bad experiences over the years with out-of-date beer that I'm not willing to gamble...
We taste-tested 10 hot dogs. Here are the best.

The New York Times Food department hasn’t taken a close look at hot dogs in some time. Back when hot dogs were on every list of foods to avoid — alarming additives, questionable cuts, salt and fat galore — home cooks didn’t want to know too much about what was in them. But cooks are different now, and so are hot dogs. We want...
Pizzas that taste just like summer
Pizzas that taste just like summer

It doesn’t take much to transform a workaday weekday into one that feels like a notable weekend. The smell of marinated meat searing on the grill makes Wednesday night feel like Friday night. The vision of a crisp, cool salad with fruit and greens from the farmers market turns back the clock from Monday to Sunday afternoon.  Few would argue...
More Stories