July Fourth Food: Roasted Potato Salad With Mustard-Walnut Vinaigrette


July Fourth is nearly here, and if you missed our potato salad story last week, here’s another recipe to get you thinking creatively about the summer holiday’s most popular side.

This dish from Food52’s new book on salads pulls the potatoes out of a bowlful of gloppy white dressing and into the oven. You won’t find many potato salads that call for roasting the potatoes first, but heating up your kitchen to do so pays off when you mix the smashed potatoes with a mustardy walnut vinaigrette, which plays up the roasted side of the spuds. All of the flavors, especially that basil, complement each other well at room temperature, so it’s perfect for a potluck.

Roasted Potato Salad With Mustard-Walnut Vinaigrette

For the mustard-walnut vinaigrette:

2 garlic cloves

Sea salt

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

1 tablespoon whole-grain mustard

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons walnut oil

Freshly ground black pepper

For the salad:

4 pounds mixed marble potatoes or other small potatoes

Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 bunch scallions, white and green parts, thinly sliced

6 to 8 eggs

1 cup walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped

Leaves from 1 bunch basil, torn

To make the vinaigrette, place the garlic on a cutting board, sprinkle with a couple of generous pinches of salt and finely chop and smash it into a paste with the side of a chef’s knife. Whisk together the garlic paste, lemon juice, vinegar and both mustards until smooth. Gradually whisk in the olive and walnut oils until emulsified. Taste and adjust the salt and pepper.

Heat the oven to 425 degrees. Arrange the potatoes in a single layer on two parchment-lined, rimmed baking sheets, drizzle with olive oil and toss to evenly coat. Season with salt and pepper. Roast, shaking the sheets occasionally, until tender and brown, 40 to 45 minutes.

Transfer the potatoes to a large bowl. Toss in the scallions and the vinaigrette. Using the back of a mixing spoon, gently smash some of the potatoes just enough to break the skins. Be careful not to make mashed potatoes. Allow the dressed potatoes to sit at room temperature for 45 to 60 minutes.

About 15 minutes before serving, bring a pot of water to a boil. Lower the eggs, a few at a time, into the water and boil for 6 minutes. Remove the eggs with a slotted spoon, plunge them into an ice bath until cool enough to handle, and then peel them.

Just before serving, stir in the walnuts and basil. Arrange the salad on plates. Top each serving with a soft-boiled egg and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Serves 6 to 8.

— From “Food52 Mighty Salads: 60 New Ways to Turn Salad into Dinner — and Make-Ahead Lunches, Too” from the editors of Food52.com



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