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No ham needed for these greens-and-eggs dishes


Green eggs and ham, though a charming idea, are about as appealing as sitting in a box with a fox on a train in the rain — which is to say, not that fun.

What is fun, however, is finding new ways to combine greens and eggs, no ham required. These three dishes are from several new cookbooks that celebrate seasonal ingredients prepared with minimal fussing — or rhyming.

Green Garlic and Chive Mayonnaise

We readily admit to making our mayo in the food processor most of the time, but everyone should make it by hand at least once to watch and feel the emulsion come together. But it does take coordination — dribbling in oil with one hand as you mash and pound with your other is a little like rubbing your tummy while patting your head.

This voluptuous golden mix is a great addition to a BLT, or you can make a deviled egg knockoff in a fraction of the time. Peel as many hard-boiled eggs as you like and halve them lengthwise. Spread a smear of this green garlic and chive mayo over each egg and garnish with some chopped chives.

— Kate Winslow

1 bulb green garlic, finely chopped (or 3 cloves garlic)

Kosher salt

1 large egg yolk, room temperature

Juice of 1/2 lemon

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 cup grapeseed oil

1 tablespoon finely chopped chives

Combine the green garlic and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a mortar and pound to a paste with a pestle. Add the egg yolk, lemon juice and mustard and mash until thickened and sticky. Combine the olive oil and grapeseed oil in a measuring cup and start adding the oils to the garlic mixture in a slow dribble, mashing and stirring the whole time to incorporate the oil. As the mixture emulsifies, it will become thick and glossy. When all the oil has been added, taste the mayonnaise and adjust the seasonings as you like, adding a little more lemon juice or salt. Stir in the chives. Use right away, or store in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Makes 1 1/2 cups.

— From “Onions Etcetera: The Essential Allium Cookbook” by Kate Winslow and Guy Ambrosino (Burgess Lea Press, $35)

Mustard Greens & Gruyère Quiche with Almond Crust

Mustard greens are one of the first greens we harvest in the spring. I love their pungent, mustardy bite, and we often sauté a handful and add them to scrambled eggs or even sandwiches instead of spreading on traditional mustard. This breakfast quiche is a great way to incorporate mustard greens into a simple, farm-fresh meal. The almond crust has a crumbly texture and adds a nutty flavor.

— Andrea Bemis

For the almond crust:

2 cups almond flour

3 cloves of garlic, minced

1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme

1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt

Pinch of freshly ground black pepper

Pinch of crushed red pepper flakes

1/3 cup olive oil

For the quiche:

1 tablespoon olive oil

3 shallots, minced (about ½ cup)

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 bunch mustard greens, roughly chopped (about 2 cups)

1/4 cup dry white wine

1/2 cup whole milk

4 eggs

½ cup grated Gruyère cheese

Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

1 teaspoon fine sea salt

Pinch of freshly ground black pepper

Place a rack in the center of the oven. Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 9-inch tart pan or pie plate with oil.

To make the crust, whisk together the almond flour, garlic, thyme, salt, black pepper and red pepper flakes in a large bowl. Stir in the oil and 4 teaspoons water. Mix until well combined.

Press the dough into the pie plate, making sure it goes at least 1 1/4 inches up the sides. Bake until the crust is lightly golden and firm to the touch, about 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare the filling. In a large cast-iron skillet, heat the oil over medium. Add the shallots and garlic and cook, stirring often, until the pieces are translucent and fragrant, about 5 minutes. Add the mustard greens and continue to cook until they begin to wilt a bit. Add the wine and continue to cook until the moisture evaporates. Remove the veggies from the heat and set them aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, cheese, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Add the cooked veggies and stir well. Pour the egg mixture into the prebaked crust and bake until the crust is a deep golden brown and the center of the quiche is set, 30 to 35 minutes. If the edges of the crust begin to brown too quickly, place foil around the edges of the pan to prevent burning. Allow the quiche to cool for a few minutes before serving. Serves 6.

— From “Dishing Up the Dirt: Simple Recipes for Cooking Through the Seasons” by Andrea Bemis (Harper Wave, $29.99)

Spinach and Egg Drop Soup

For many of us, our first taste of egg drop soup came from a plastic container along with a fortune cookie, duck sauce and white rice. I began making my own version with tatsoi, which is a firm plant similar to spinach with a mild, mustardy bite. This recipe calls for spinach because it’s easier to find in most markets, but if you’re able to locate some tatsoi, then I encourage you to be adventurous and swap it in as the main green. You’ll be surprised how easy this soup is to make. Within seconds of adding the egg, the broth thickens, and moments later, you’ll be ladling the sumptuous mixture into a bowl, never to return to Chinese takeout. How’s that for a fortune, sans cookie?

— Summer Rayne Oakes

For homemade vegetable broth:

2 garlic cloves, sliced

1/2 yellow onion, diced

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

2 to 3 carrots, diced

1 to 2 carrot tops

2 celery stalks

2 to 4 sprigs thyme

16 cups water

1 to 2 bay leaves, optional

1 teaspoon celery seeds, optional

1 to 2 cloves, optional

Sauté the garlic and onion with the olive oil in the bottom of the pressure cooker until they are fragrant, approximately 2 minutes.

Add the remainder of the ingredients to the pressure cooker. Use at least 16 cups of water or fill the cooker ¾ of the way full. Seal the pressure cooker, bring it to pressure, and cook for 50 minutes.

Turn off the heat. The pressure will drop automatically. Strain the liquid through a sieve into another large pot. I often also use a heavy duty paper towel with the sieve as well. Press the liquid from the vegetables into the new pot. Compost the remaining vegetables.

For the egg drop soup:

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 shallot, thinly sliced

1 tablespoon peeled and julienned ginger

2 cloves garlic, chopped

4 cups vegetable broth (homemade from above recipe or store-bought)

Pinch sea salt, to taste

Pepper, to taste

2 eggs, lightly beaten

1 bunch spinach

Handful green onion, chopped

Parsley, for garnish

¼ teaspoon sesame seeds, for garnish

Heat the olive oil in a deep pot over medium heat and add the shallot and ginger, stirring for about 2 minutes until they are fragrant. Add the garlic and sauté for another minute.

Pour the vegetable broth over the shallot and garlic mixture. Season with salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer.

Whisk the eggs in a small bowl with a little salt and pepper. Add the spinach and green onions to the vegetable broth and cook until wilted, about 30 seconds. Begin stirring in the egg mixture slowly. Season to taste, garnish and serve.

— From “SugarDetoxMe: 100+ Recipes to Curb Cravings and Take Back Your Health” by Summer Rayne Oakes (Sterling Epicure, $24.95)



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