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Don’t miss the deadline for our Austin360 Holiday Cookie Contest!


I don’t know about you, but I’ve got the holidays on my mind. It might have been the jingle bells I heard on an ad that aired weeks before Halloween or the Christmas gift list that’s started in my head, but let’s be honest, it’s mostly because my inbox is filling up with cookie recipes you all have been submitting for our Austin360 Holiday Cookie Contest.

I’m rounding up the judges, starting to peek at the submissions in the taste category and, because we haven’t had many photos submitted yet, crossing my fingers that we’ll have a few decorated cookies come in before this week’s deadline. We’ll keep the submission window open through the end of the day on Friday, and you can find the entry form and details at austin360.com/cookiecontest.

Here’s a recipe from “Cooking Solo: The Fun of Cooking for Yourself” by Klancy Miller (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $19.99) to tide you over until we name the winners in a big cookie story after Thanksgiving.

Triple Chocolate Chip Cookies

I consider myself the original cookie monster, and my all-time favorite is chocolate chip. I add cocoa powder to the dough, use both semisweet and milk chocolate morsels, and add a little more salt than usual to bring out all that chocolaty goodness. If you like yours less salty, use 1 1/2 teaspoons salt instead of 2. This is a cookie-on-demand recipe: You bake as many as you want upfront, and form the rest of the dough into a slice-and-bake roll to stash in your freezer.

— Klancy Miller

2 cups all-purpose flour

3 Tbsp. unsweetened cocoa powder

2 tsp. fleur de sel or other flaky sea salt

1 tsp. baking soda

1 1/2 cups lightly packed light brown sugar

1 cup (2 sticks) butter, at room temperature

1 tsp. vanilla extract

2 large eggs

1 cup semisweet chocolate chips

1 cup milk chocolate chunks

Heat the oven to 375 degrees. In a medium bowl, whisk the flour with the cocoa powder, salt and baking soda until well combined.

In a large bowl, use a wooden spoon or handheld electric mixer to beat the brown sugar and butter until well combined and creamy. Beat in the vanilla. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing after each addition. Add the dry ingredients, mixing until combined. Stir in the semisweet and milk chocolate pieces.

Decide how many cookies you would like to eat right now and drop that many heaping teaspoons of dough onto an ungreased baking sheet, spacing them at least 2 inches apart. (For the remaining dough, see last step.)

Bake the cookies for 9 to 11 minutes, until firm and lightly golden. Let them cool on the baking sheet for a few minutes before transferring them to a cooling rack. Serve warm.

Cut a 20-inch piece of wax or parchment paper and dump the remaining dough onto it. Using your hands and the natural curl of the paper, roll the dough into a log shape about 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Wrap the dough log tightly in aluminum foil or plastic wrap and place it in the freezer.

Whenever you want cookies, preheat the oven to 375 degrees, unwrap one end of the dough log and cut a 1-inch slice for each cookie. Place on an ungreased baking sheet and bake for about 10 minutes, or until lightly golden. Rewrap and refreeze the remaining dough. It will keep well in the freezer for up to 2 months. Makes about 3 dozen 3- to 3 1/2 -inch cookies.

— From “Cooking Solo: The Fun of Cooking for Yourself” by Klancy Miller (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $19.99)


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