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Chutneys blend sweet with sour for incredible fall flavors


How do we know it’s fall?

It’s getting dark way too early in the evening, for one thing. And the sidewalk is starting to feel way too chilly beneath my bare toes when I walk outside to pick up my morning newspaper, for another.

But mostly, it’s about the changing guard of flavors, which in autumn make a slow slide from the bright, sunny savor of berries, melons and stone fruits to the tangy crunch of apples, the spicy warmth of ginger and cinnamon, and the meaty sweetness of fresh pumpkins and fat, purple plums.

» Where in Atlanta you can buy fresh turkeys for Thanksgiving

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» Atlanta sommeliers tell you what wines to serve with your Thanksgiving

Fall chutneys are a perfect way to capture those distinctive tastes and aromas.

With local strawberries and peaches in our rearview mirror, it’s time to switch gears and think “savory” instead of “sweet.” Or maybe tart-sweet is a better descriptor because American-style chutneys are cooked to a jam-like consistency with more than a little sugar. They also include vinegar, which works both to preserve the fruits and vegetables and give them a bit of tang. Onion and garlic often make an appearance. There also can be unexpected aromatics, such as black pepper, red chili pepper, and mustard or fennel seeds.

It’s a bit different in India, where the condiment originated (chatni is Hindi for “sauce”) and is often used to enliven rice dishes (think mint chutney, cilantro chutney and tamarind-date chutney). Ingredients can range from peanut to coconut to vegetables such as tomato, onion and beet, and the finished product — which can be cooked or raw — often resembles what Americans consider a relish.

Chutney made its way west across the Indian and Atlantic oceans during the British colonial era. In the process, the recipe was modified somewhat with the addition of vinegar to give it a longer shelf life so it could be eaten throughout the year. The ingredient list also was expanded to include the seasonal bounty of English orchards — think apples, quince and damson plums — along with sweet dried fruits such as raisins for added flavor.

Thick and chunky, chutney can be used to perk up cheeses, bread, cured or roasted meats, and as a spread for crackers. It also brightens a grilled cheese sandwich, and when mixed with a little olive oil or water over low heat, it makes a terrific glaze or marinade.

» Would you have a turkey-less Thanksgiving?

» Goodbye, roasted turkey — Say hello to crusted pork!

SWEET AND SPICY APPLE CHUTNEY

Post-Gazette tested

Serve this awesome chutney with grilled or roasted pork chops or a juicy slice of ham; on a cheese board, Brian Keyser of Pittsburgh’s Casellula @ Alphabet City suggests pairing it with a blue-veined cheddar such as Dunbarton Blue. It’s also absolutely delicious tucked inside a grilled cheese sandwich.

2 cups cider vinegar

2 cups light brown sugar

5 garlic cloves

2 ounces fresh ginger, peeled and sliced or coarsely chopped

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon red chili flakes

2 pounds Granny Smith apples

1 1/2 cups golden raisins

2 sticks cinnamon

2 tablespoons yellow mustard seeds

Place vinegar, brown sugar, garlic, ginger, salt and red chili flakes in blender. Puree on medium-high until smooth, about 1 minute.

Peel apples and cut out core. Discard core. Dice apples into 1/4-inch-thick cubes. They need not be perfectly uniform.

Place apples, raisins, cinnamon and mustard seeds in large saucepan. Pour vinegar blend over apples. Simmer, stirring occasionally, over medium heat until almost all the liquid is reduced, about 25 minutes.

Remove cinnamon sticks. Turn off heat and let cool.

Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Serve cold, warm or at room temperature.

Yields 3 cups.

— “Composing the Cheese Plate: Recipes, Pairings and Platings for the Inventive Cheese Course” by Brian Keyser and Leigh Friend (Running Press, September 2016, $22)

SPICED PUMPKIN CHUTNEY

PG tested

Forget the pie. This recipe will be your new favorite way to cook pumpkin at Thanksgiving. Red chili peppers add just the right amount of bite while ginger adds spice. I spread it on toast but it also makes a wonderful dip for crackers.

2 1/2-pound pumpkin, peeled and seeded

2 medium onions, finely chopped

2 small red chili peppers, seeded and finely chopped

2 cups light brown sugar

2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice

2 teaspoons ground cloves

1 teaspoon salt

3 tablespoons minced fresh ginger

2 1/2 cups white wine vinegar

Dice pumpkin. Place in wide saucepan with remaining ingredients. Mix well.

Place pan over medium-high heat, bring to boil, then reduce to medium-low. Simmer uncovered until pumpkin is very tender and liquid has thickened, 45 minutes to an hour. (If chutney thickens but pumpkin is not soft, partially cover and cook as needed.)

While chutney cooks, sterilize two one-pint canning jars and their lids in boiling water for several minutes. When chutney is ready, spoon it into jars, cover with lids and allow to cool. Can be stored unopened at room temperature for up to three months.

— “Kitchen” by Nigella Lawson

SPICED CARROT CHUTNEY

PG tested

This crunchy, spicy chutney can be served with feta, farmer’s cheese or any other salty pressed cheese. Also delicious with cold meats or on top of rice.

1 pound medium carrots

1 small yellow onion

2 garlic cloves

1 ounce fresh ginger, peeled and coarsely chopped

1 cup white wine vinegar

2 tablespoons yellow mustard seeds

2 teaspoons cumin seeds

1/2 cup golden raisins

1/2 cup light brown sugar

1 teaspoon salt

Peel carrots and trim off tops and bottoms. Grate carrots on the largest hole of box grater. Yield will be about 3 cups. Set aside.

Peel onion. Grate it on the largest hole of box grater. Set aside.

Puree the garlic, ginger and vinegar in a blender, on high, for 2 minutes or until smooth.

Combine all ingredients in medium saucepan. Bring to boil over medium heat. Coo, stirring occasionally, over medium heat for about 15 minutes, or until most of the liquid is reduced.

Remove chutney from heat and let it cool to room temperature. Store in airtight container in refrigerator for up to 1 week. Serve at room temperature.

Yields 2 cups.

— “Composing the Cheese Plate: Recipes, Pairings and Platings for the Inventive Cheese Course” by Brian Keyser and Leigh Friend (Running Press, September 2016, $22)

SPICED PLUM CHUTNEY

PG tested

Supermarket plums can be disappointing to eat out of hand. This sweet-spicy chutney, perfumed with ginger, cloves and pepper, is anything but. It’s good enough to eat by the spoonful right out of the jar. Terrific on roasted chicken or a pan-seared pork chop, and a great way to start your day on top of waffles.

1 whole star anise

1 whole clove

1 (2-inch) piece cinnamon stick

1/2 cup red wine vinegar

1/2 cup sugar

1 2-inch piece peeled fresh ginger, cut into ½-inch-thick rounds

1 tablespoon whole mustard seeds

1 teaspoon ground black pepper

2 pounds red, black, green, or blue plums (tart or sweet; about 5 large), quartered, pitted

Finely grind star anise, clove, and cinnamon stick in spice mill or coffee grinder.

Combine spice mixture, vinegar, sugar, ginger, mustard seeds, and pepper in heavy large saucepan. Stir over medium-high heat until sugar dissolves and bring to boil. Add plums; reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer until chutney thickens and chunky sauce forms, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes. Cool. Season to taste with salt.

Makes about 4 cups.

— Epicurious

NECTARINE-FENNEL CHUTNEY

PG tested

Chutneys often rely on ginger for flavor. This recipe hangs its hat on fennel, a vegetable in the carrot family that has a sweet licorice flavor. Stuff this fresh chutney into a pork tenderloin for an extra-special meal. Or mix it with mayonnaise and roasted chicken for a quick sandwich salad.

1 3/4 pounds ripe nectarines, peeled and pitted

1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds

3/4 cup packed light brown sugar

1/2 cup white wine vinegar

1/2 cup finely chopped red onion

1/2 cup finely diced fennel

1 small jalapeno pepper, seeded and chopped

1/3 cup golden raisins

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/2 teaspoon salt

Cut nectarines into 1/2-inch wedges.

In heavy, dry pot over medium heat, toast fennel seeds until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in sugar and vinegar, and bring mixture to a boil. Stir in onion, fennel, jalapeno, raisins, black pepper and salt. Reduce heat and simmer very gently for 10 minutes. Stir in nectarines and simmer, stirring occasionally, until fruit is tender and juices are thick enough that they don’t pool when dragged with a spoon, about 10 minutes.

Ladle the hot chutney into jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe rims and apply lids and bands; process in boiling water canner for 10 minutes. Allow jars to seal, and store in a cool, dark place. Refrigerate after opening.

Makes 2 to 3 8-ounce jars

— “Fruitful: Four Seasons of Fresh Fruit Recipes” by Brian Nicholson and Sarah Huck (Running Press, $27.50)



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