Couple welcomes 'miracle baby' after struggling with infertility for years


After struggling with infertility for years, one couple in Gainesville, Georgia, finally has its little miracle.

John and Jennie Hill were willing to try everything after multiple pregnancies ended with miscarriages, leaving them heartbroken.

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The couple's story starts when they eloped in August 2014 and immediately decided to try for a family. Jennie Hill said she got pregnant right away, but miscarried each time.  

"Because I had lost five angels, my doctor decided to order a karyotype blood test, and it was then that we found out that I have a genetic chromosome disorder called balanced translocation," she said.

Doctors said that was the cause of Hill's recurrent miscarriages, and 1 in 500 people have it, although many do not know it.

After speaking with several specialists and genetic counselors, the Hills decided to go the IVF route. Between three surgeries, doctors were able to get 65 eggs, of which 47 fertilized. Only 13 eggs made it to genetic testing, and out of those, two balanced embryos made it -- their little miracle. 

Related: Couple announces twins with touching photo of more than 400 IVF needles

Harper Grace was born on Jan. 25.

"We believe it was a lot of prayers that brought her into this world," Jennie Hill said. "It was all worth it in the end, every nervous moment."

Jennie Hill explains Harper means "someone who plays a harp; angelic." Her name is also in memory of her five angel siblings in heaven. Grace means "kindness, mercy, favor. God's favor and love toward mankind."

"We have truly felt God's imminent grace throughout this process," Jennie Hill said.

Hill hopes that her story inspires others to never lose hope. If there is one thing she could stress to those who dream of a child of their own someday, it is this: Never, ever give up.

"We lived by the fact that God promises a rainbow after the storm," Jennie Hill explained. "Babies born after a miscarriage are called rainbows. It signifies a promise after a storm (loss). We decided we would just learn to dance in the rain while waiting for our rainbow to come. Now our hope is for others to experience it, too."


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