Couple welcomes 'miracle baby' after struggling with infertility for years


After struggling with infertility for years, one couple in Gainesville, Georgia, finally has its little miracle.

John and Jennie Hill were willing to try everything after multiple pregnancies ended with miscarriages, leaving them heartbroken.

>> Read more trending stories  

The couple's story starts when they eloped in August 2014 and immediately decided to try for a family. Jennie Hill said she got pregnant right away, but miscarried each time.  

"Because I had lost five angels, my doctor decided to order a karyotype blood test, and it was then that we found out that I have a genetic chromosome disorder called balanced translocation," she said.

Doctors said that was the cause of Hill's recurrent miscarriages, and 1 in 500 people have it, although many do not know it.

After speaking with several specialists and genetic counselors, the Hills decided to go the IVF route. Between three surgeries, doctors were able to get 65 eggs, of which 47 fertilized. Only 13 eggs made it to genetic testing, and out of those, two balanced embryos made it -- their little miracle. 

Related: Couple announces twins with touching photo of more than 400 IVF needles

Harper Grace was born on Jan. 25.

"We believe it was a lot of prayers that brought her into this world," Jennie Hill said. "It was all worth it in the end, every nervous moment."

Jennie Hill explains Harper means "someone who plays a harp; angelic." Her name is also in memory of her five angel siblings in heaven. Grace means "kindness, mercy, favor. God's favor and love toward mankind."

"We have truly felt God's imminent grace throughout this process," Jennie Hill said.

Hill hopes that her story inspires others to never lose hope. If there is one thing she could stress to those who dream of a child of their own someday, it is this: Never, ever give up.

"We lived by the fact that God promises a rainbow after the storm," Jennie Hill explained. "Babies born after a miscarriage are called rainbows. It signifies a promise after a storm (loss). We decided we would just learn to dance in the rain while waiting for our rainbow to come. Now our hope is for others to experience it, too."


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Lifestyle

Why do so many kids have anxiety? Some answers
Why do so many kids have anxiety? Some answers

Is anxiety the new depression in our kids? We’ve been writing about that in many ways during the last five years.  More people are talking about it after a New York Times story about high-schoolers and anxiety. That story pointed out that 51 percent of kids who visited college mental health services in the 2015-2016 school year...
Is your pediatrician talking sex with your children?
Is your pediatrician talking sex with your children?

A new recommendation — Sexual and Reproductive Health Care Services in the Pediatric Setting  — from the Committee on Adolescence at the American Academy of Pediatrics, reminds pediatricians how important they are in the sexual health of their teen patients. Lauren Fant, left, 18, winces as she has...
Do University of Texas, Texas A&M make top colleges list?
Do University of Texas, Texas A&M make top colleges list?

Financial analyzer Wallet Hub looked at the price of college and financing, selectivity, student-faculty ratio, graduation rates and post-attendance median salary and more to rank the top 30 universities and colleges in the United States.  University of Texas incoming freshman Maxwell Gaddy, from Midland gets help from...
Tired of traffic? Try one of these unusual commutes instead
Tired of traffic? Try one of these unusual commutes instead

Why sit in traffic when you can catch a workout on your commute to work? We checked in with a quartet of Austin residents who park the car at home now and then or skip the bus and travel to work under the power of their own muscles. We’re pretty sure they arrive at the office in a better frame of mind than those who sit in gridlock traffic on...
Volunteer logs almost three decades of pacing the Austin AIDS Walk
Volunteer logs almost three decades of pacing the Austin AIDS Walk

At the peak of the AIDS crisis, Becky Helton remembers hearing about an Austinite who was out of the office for a few weeks. Turns out that person was diagnosed with HIV. “Their desk was moved to ‘Siberia,’” she recalls. “This is in an office setting, not in a place where anyone would be at risk. It broke my heart to see...
More Stories