Thanks to Amazing Acro-cats and more, lots to entertain you this week


1. The Amazing Acro-cats

7 p.m. Jan. 19-20, 21 and 23; 3 p.m. Jan. 21; 1 and 5 p.m. Jan. 22. $27. Stateside at the Paramount, 719 Congress Ave. 512-472-5470, austintheatre.org.

The Amazing Acro-cats are a troupe of real house cats that will jump and pounce their way into your heart. Reaching out to shelters in need and accepting cats found homeless in the streets, Samantha Martin has not only rescued her own cats but has also found homes for more than 182 cats and kittens. After she’s given them a second chance with positive reinforcement-only clicker training, the cats take these amazing abilities on the road and tour the nation in the infamous Acro-cat Bus. Their act — including tightrope walks — is something you must see to believe.

2. Eric Johnson at Paramount Theatre

8 p.m. Jan. 15. $20-$45. 713 Congress Ave. austintheatre.org.

Long considered by many to be Austin’s premier electric guitarist — even in the 1980s when he and Stevie Ray Vaughan were the city’s twin-engine burners of prog-rock and blues — Johnson has taken an intriguing turn toward acoustic guitar and piano on his new album “EJ,” due in early October. He’ll play both guitar and keyboards in this solo performance. (Rescheduled from Nov. 19; tickets to that show will be honored for this one.) — Peter Blackstock

3. The Craft Series at the 1886 Cafe & Bakery

6 to 8:30 p.m. Jan. 16. $40. The Driskill Hotel, 604 Brazos St. eventbrite.com/e/the-craft-series-at-1886-tickets-30819563143?aff=erelpanelorg.

The monthly beer dinner between a local brewery and the Driskill has returned, this time with the Hill Country’s Last Stand Brewing. The culinary team, including executive chef Troy Knapp, has partnered with the North Austin brewery to create a menu of four courses with four beers for all the food and beer enthusiasts out there. You’ll need to register for the event ahead of time to ensure a spot, but you won’t have to pay the bill until after the dinner is finished.

4. Astronomy on Tap

7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Jan. 17. Free. The North Door, 502 Brushy St. facebook.com/events/1838853842996659.

The first Astronomy on Tap of the year brings three out-of-this-world talks to astronomy lovers about planets, life and the overlap of science and fiction. Professor Dan Jaffe will talk about how to detect life on other planets, while Michael Endl will discuss the discovery of an Earth-size planet in the habitable zone of the star nearest to the sun. Concluding the night is Christina Soontornvat, who will explain how scientists and fiction writers have more in common than they think.

5. Kevin Allison’s “Risk! Live”

8 p.m. Jan. 18. $19.99. Stateside at the Paramount, 719 Congress Ave. austintheatre.org.

“Risk! Live,” the award-winning storytelling show, returns to Austin for a night of true stories from Kevin Allison (“The State,” “Reno 911”) and local talent including David Kendall, Kate Caldwell, Paul Normandin and Redd Jefferson. The show takes a walk on the wilder side with its true and uncensored personal tales, ranging from hilarious to provocative to highly emotional. It’s recorded for the popular Risk podcast, downloaded nearly 1.5 million times every month by fans.

6. Way Off Broadway’s “Send Me No Flowers”

8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through Feb. 4; 3 p.m. Jan. 22. $10-$20. 11880 West FM 2243, Leander. wobcp.org.

The fast-paced comedy from Way Off Broadway Community Players centers on the hypochondriachal George, who overhears his doctor discussing another patient’s dying diagnosis and thinks it’s his own. In response, he decides to put his affairs in order before the end — but when his wife finds out about his impending demise, she suspects an affair and begins putting her own affairs in order. The movie version of this show starred Rock Hudson and Doris Day.

7. “Not Original to Its Location” at Grayduck Gallery

Opening reception 7 to 10 p.m. Jan. 21. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday through Feb. 19. 2213 E. Cesar Chavez St. grayduckgallery.com.

This exhibit brings together two photographers who dive into the human body through surgeries, implants and medical waste. Erin Neve, an artist based in Washington, uses her own experience with surgery to create her still lifes. Sarah Sudhoff, an artist, photographer, educator and former photo editor for Texas Monthly and Time magazines, explores the material that is discarded after an important event, such as what happens with medical implant recycling.



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