“The Trump boys” stop by SNL’s Weekend Update, snacks at the ready


One of the best skits in the post-Trump "Saturday Night Live" panoply has been the appearances of the Trump boys, Eric and Don Jr., portrayed as the Beavis and Butthead of the first family. They returned to the SNL stage on March 4 for some new shenanigans.

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Mikey Day plays a slick Don Jr. As the alpha of the two brothers, he can form a complete sentence while dressed in his early-90s-NBA-coach suit and haircut.  Alex Moffatt, on the other hand, imbues Eric Trump with Rain Man-esque outbursts, like “I drove the golf car!” or “I got a sunburn!”

For example, Don Jr. begins telling Colin Jost about when the boys attended a ribbon-cutting cermeony at the newest Trump hotel in Vancouver, explaining how amazing and “next level" the head chef is. Eric agrees, “I had a funny face pancake! He had whipped cream hair!” Which seems to remind Eric that he’s hungry.

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Ever the good brother, Don Jr. takes out a sandwich bag of Cheerios, which Eric proceeds to eat like a grade schooler opening his first box of Lucky Charms. No snack would be complete without a juice box though, as Eric stabs the straw into his juice like he’s trying to murder it.

The skit also made fun of news reports about the ongoing conflict of interest between the president and his global business dealings.

“The only people making decisions regarding the Trump Organization are Eric and myself,” said Day playing Don Jr. “And Dad,” interjects Moffat's child-like Eric while munching on the dry Cheerios and slurping from his juice box (after multiple efforts to get the straw in) – a portrayal that just might be the Real Donald’s best evidence in his crusade to prove SNL maliciousness.


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