Liam Neeson says sexual harassment scandals becoming 'a witch hunt'


According to Liam Neeson, the sexual harassment allegations plaguing Hollywood and other industries are turning into “a bit of a witch hunt.”

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In an interview on Ireland’s “The Late Late Show,” the 65-year-old addressed the growing slew of accusations in the industry stemming from the bombshell claims against Harvey Weinstein in October, reported The Hill.

>> On Rare.us: After being slammed for an unpopular opinion, Matt Damon still isn’t backing down

“There is a bit of a witch hunt happening too. There’s some people, famous people, being suddenly accused of touching some girl’s knee or something, and suddenly, they’re being dropped from their program or something,” Neeson said.

Neeson was referring to the story of NPR’s radio host and writer Garrison Keillor, who was fired from Minnesota Public radio after being accused of inappropriate behavior with a co-worker, according to the New York Post.

According to the actor, the incident regarding Keillor differed from those involving Kevin Spacey, who was disgraced after news broke of him allegedly displaying inappropriate behavior toward a then 14-year-old Anthony Rapp in 1986, and Harvey Weinstein.

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Neeson went on to describe that the allegations lobbied against Dustin Hoffman were “childhood stuff.”

“I think Dustin Hoffman … I’m not saying I’ve done similar things like what he did, apparently, he touched a girl’s breast and stuff, but it’s childhood stuff,” Neeson said.

The accusations against Hoffman include exposing himself and groping a teenage intern on one of his movie sets.

>> On Rare.us: Liam Neeson has announced his retirement from action movies and the world is weeping

The “Taken” star continued his statements by acknowledging that the #MeToo movement has been positive for all industries.

“There is a movement happening and it’s healthy, and it’s across every industry. The focus seems to be on Hollywood, but it’s across every industry,” he said.


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