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Learn about archaeology or Austin’s moontowers during Tuesday’s events


1. “Last of the Moonlight Towers” screening

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Jan. 10. Free. Austin History Center, 810 Guadalupe St. library.austintexas.gov/event/last-moonlight-towers-376552.

The Austin History Center is hosting a special screening of this documentary film, which tells the story of one of Austin’s most celebrated landmarks and how the city became the only place with these towers today. Once, a moonlight tower was a popular way to illuminate parts of towns or cities, reaching its zenith in use in the 1880s and ’90s and becoming nearly extinct in subsequent years. A Q&A with the filmmakers will follow the screening, and light refreshments will be served.

2. “The Umlauf Prize: EchindaLabs.”

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through Jan. 29. $1-$5. Umlauf Sculpture Garden and Museum, 605 Robert E. Lee Road. 512-445-5582. umlaufsculpture.org.

Elizabeth McClellan is this year’s winner of the Umlauf Prize, an award given to a University of Texas sculpture student. Her “EchindaLabs” is a kitschy take on the blur of body science and the marketing of the beauty industry. In celebration of the Umlauf’s 25th Anniversary, the show is also displaying a retrospective with new works from previous prize winners, including Gracelee Lawrence and Ryan Hawk (2015), Stephanie Wagner (2007) and Mark Schatz (2005).

3. Lone Pint Pairing Dinner at G’Raj Mahal

6 p.m. Jan. 10. $44. 73 Rainey St. facebook.com/events/1836462789900986/.

This four-course pairing dinner features Lone Pint brews — including the stellar Yellow Rose IPA. The dinner, in the restaurant’s cozy heated tent, will take place at 7 p.m. Pairings include the Yellow Rose with vegetable fritters and the Gentleman Relish, a brown ale, with Cherry Kulfi, a house-made Indian-style ice cream. Vegetarian or vegan options are also available. Lone Pint will give each diner a commemorative glass.

4. TXMOST Talks at Texas Museum Science & Technology

6:30 to 8 p.m. Jan. 10. $10. 1220 Toro Grande Drive, Cedar Park. shop.txmost.org.

To kick off this series about various scientific concepts, as explained by local science and technology professionals, Clark Wernecke will be speaking about the use of technology in archaeology and what some of the modern techniques are that these scientists use. TXMOST Talks are free to members or included with that day’s admission. Otherwise, $10 tickets for the event are available online or at the door. Snacks and drinks will be provided.



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