Family at center of crashed BBC News interview talks about video going viral


The family of Pusan National University professor Robert Kelly unexpectedly crashed his interview with BBC News Friday and four days later, are talking about it.

The clip of the interview crashes shows Kelly  speaking discussing South Korean politics when Kelly's 4 year old daughter, Marion, opens the door to his office and happily jaunts in. Soon to follow is 8-month-old son, James, bouncing in a walker and moments later, Kelly's wife, Jung-a Kim, runs in, softly pulling the children away after a quick struggle.

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The BBC News YouTube upload of the incident has over 16 million views.

The family spoke to The Wall Street Journal about the incident, saying that the door to the office is typically locked.

"Most of the time they come back to me after they find the locked door," Jung-a said. "But they didn’t. And then I saw the door was open. It was chaos for me."

On Tuesday, the family returned to the scene of the crime and appeared on BBC News  from their Busan, South Korea apartment days after going viral. This time they were all intentionally on camera.

Related: Dancing, gliding kids crash dad's BBC News interview, steal the show

"We've watched it multiple times … and our families have watched it as well and everyone seems to think it's pretty hysterical, so we understand why people find it enjoyable."

Jung-a said that things have been stressful since the video spread across the internet.

"We're trying to handle it," she said. "We're fine. Getting better."

"We laughed a lot," Jung-a said of their initial reaction.

"We were worried that the BBC would never call us again, actually," Kelly said. "That we had just completely blown our relationship with you."

BBC reporter James Menendez then asked the couple about assumptions by some that Jung-a was a nanny to the children and not their mother.

"We were pretty uncomfortable with it."

"I hope people just enjoy (the video), not argue over this thing because I'm not a nanny," Jung-a said of internet debates of whether or not she was a nanny. "That's the truth. So I hope they stop doing the arguing."

And for those wondering if Kelly didn't help escort the children out because he was wearing sweats or pajamas: "Yes, I was wearing pants," Kelly said.

Watch the full interview with BBC News below:


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