Tom Hanks added to Texas Book Festival lineup


Highlights

Tickets on sale for Tom Hanks talk with Lawrence Wright, which also will be shown at some Alamo Drafthouses.

Most of the other book festival events are free and open to the public.

Screenwriter, director, producer, actor and “Bosom Buddy” Tom Hanks will be coming to Austin for the 2017 Texas Book Festival to present his new collection of short fiction, “Uncommon Type.”

Hanks will discuss his stories with best-selling author Lawrence Wright (“The Looming Tower”) at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 4 at First Baptist Church, 901 Trinity St., book festival organizers announced Tuesday.

Unlike most other book fest events, this one is not free.

Tickets are on sale for $48 at www.texasbookfestival.org. Each ticket includes one pre-signed copy of the book and admits one person to the event. A portion of ticket sales supports the Texas Book Festival’s literacy programs and the nonprofit’s mission to inspire Texans of all ages to love reading.

The festival is partnering with the Alamo Drafthouse to broadcast the event live to a selection of Drafthouse theaters nationwide, including in Houston, Lubbock, Richardson, El Paso, Denver, Brooklyn, Kansas City, Mo., and Chandler, Ariz.

The book festival draws about 40,000 people over two days, and its lineup includes writers in literary fiction, genre fiction, history, politics, Texana, memoir, cooking and children’s literature. The festival also features panel discussions, cooking demonstrations, live music and activities for kids.

Dan Rather, Jennifer Egan and Jeffrey Eugenides are just a few of the more than 280 authors previously announced for the 21st Texas Book Festival, which is Nov. 4 -5 at the Capitol and surrounding grounds.

Of particular interest to Texans are former Harper’s editor Roger D. Hodge’s “Texas Blood: Seven Generations Among the Outlaws, Ranchers, Indians, Missionaries, Soldiers, and Smugglers of the Borderlands,” his part-reported, part-memoir look at several generations (seven, in fact) of his family’s ranch; and the poetry of Texas State professor Tomás Q. Morín, author of the collection “Patient Zero.”

The First Edition Literary Gala, the main annual fundraiser for the festival, will be Nov. 3 at the Four Seasons Hotel.

New York Times best-selling author Walter Isaacson, author Min Jin Lee, writer/producer Attica Locke, and New Yorker poetry editor Kevin Young are all featured guests for the dinner and are book fest participants. Texas Monthly Executive Editor Skip Hollandsworth will emcee this year’s gala.

Lee is the award-winning author of “Pachinko,” the epic saga of a Korean family told across four generations and much of the 20th century.

Isaacson is president and CEO of the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan educational and policy studies institute based in Washington. He has been the chairman and CEO of CNN and the editor of Time magazine. He is also the best-selling author of “Steve Jobs,” “Einstein: His Life and Universe” and “Benjamin Franklin: An American Life.” His most recent biography is that of “Leonardo da Vinci.”

Houston native Attica Locke is the author of “Pleasantville,” which won the 2016 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction, and was a writer and producer on the Fox TV drama “Empire.” Her new thriller, “Bluebird, Bluebird,” takes place in East Texas.

In addition to being the New Yorker poetry editor, Young is the author of 11 books of poetry and prose, most recently “Blue Laws: Selected & Uncollected Poems 1995-2015,” long-listed for the National Book Award. His latest nonfiction book is “Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News.”

Hollandsworth is the author of the excellent “The Midnight Assassin,” about the hunt for America’s first serial killer in 19th century Austin. He also wrote the film “Bernie” with Richard Linklater.



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