Relive your youthful obsessions with ‘Searching for John Hughes’


Recommended reading

“Searching for John Hughes” by Jason Diamond (HarperCollins). As chronicled in this memoir, New York writer Jason Diamond grew up in suburban Chicago, the same place that visionary 1980s director John Hughes set his teen-angsty classics such as “The Breakfast Club” and “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.” So he was already ripe for serious fandom. All but abandoned by his parents and virtually homeless as a teen, Diamond became lost in Hughes-world. As an unhappy 20-something, he makes a Don Quixote-style attempt to write a biography of Hughes, something he has no idea how to do. This serves mostly as an excuse to a) convince himself he’s a real writer; and b) obsessively rewatch the Hughes catalog. As one might imagine, the Hughes bio didn’t come together, but this book does. Diamond, a sports editor at Rolling Stone, is older and wiser and happier now, and “Searching” is a darkly funny look at how youthful obsession can fuel us even when the rest of world is saying, “I do not care about you or your project. Now, do you want me to keep your tab open or close it out?” Diamond speaks and signs at 6 p.m. Saturday at BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd.

— Joe Gross

Book events this week

Richard Garriott. 3 p.m. Sunday. The entrepreneur speaks and signs “Explore/Create: My Life in Pursuit of New Frontiers, Hidden Worlds, and the Creative Spark.” BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd.

Manjula Martin. 7 p.m. Tuesday. The editor speaks and signs “Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living.” BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd.

Chanelle Benz. 7 p.m. Wednesday. The Houston author speaks and signs “The Man Who Shot Out My Eye Is Dead.” BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd.

JT McCormick. 7 p.m. Friday. The author and businessman speaks and signs “I Got There.” BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd.

Pascal Simon. 2 p.m. Saturday. The pastry chef speaks and signs “Bake Austin Kids.” BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd.



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