Looking for a good book? See what’s on the best-seller list


Rankings based on reports from selected book stores in Southern California:

NONFICTION

1. “Hillbilly Elegy,” by J.D. Vance (Harper: $27.99). The investment banker’s account of growing up poor in Appalachia.

2. “South and West,” by Joan Didion (Knopf: $21). Excerpts from the author’s unpublished notebooks from a Southern road trip and Patty Hearst’s trial.

3. “Dear Ijeawele,” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Knopf: $15). A feminist manifesto in 15 suggestions on raising girls to become strong, independent women.

4. “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” by Marie Kondo (Ten Speed Press: $16.99). The cleaning guru’s method to decluttering your home and simplifying your life.

5. “Sapiens,” by Yuval Norah Harari (Harper: $35). An examination of humanity’s creation and evolution.

6. “Homo Deus,” by Yuval Noah Harari (Harper: $35). A look into the future by the author of “Sapiens.”

7. “Rad Women Worldwide,” by Kate Schatz (Ten Speed Press: $15.99). An illustrated collection of 40 diverse profiles of females who shaped the world.

8. “A Colony in a Nation,” by Chris Hayes (Norton: $26.95). The MSNBC news anchor explores inequality between the affluent, white elite and the urban poor.

9. “The Hidden Life of Trees,” by Peter Wohlleben (Greystone Books: $24.95). The case that trees in the forest are purposeful, social beings living in dynamic relationship with each other.

10. “Portraits of Courage,” by George W. Bush (Crown: $35). Paintings and stories of America’s military veterans by the former president.

FICTION

1. “Norse Mythology,” by Neil Gaiman (Norton: $25.95). A reimagining of the great Norse tales of Thor and other gods.

2. “Lincoln in the Bardo,” by George Saunders (Random House: $28). President Abraham Lincoln grieves the loss of his son and is haunted by ghosts.

3. “Exit West,” by Mohsin Hamid (Riverhead: $26). Two refugees begin a romance and find home with the help of magical realism.

4. “Vicious Circle,” by C.J. Box (Putnam: $27). A recently released prisoner seeks revenge on Wyoming game warden, Joe Pickett.

5. “The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane,” by Lisa See (Scribner: $27). A Chinese tea seller moves to California where her adopted daughter lives.

6. “A Gentleman in Moscow,” by Amor Towles (Viking: $27). In 1922, a Russian count is sentenced to house arrest in a grand hotel for the rest of his life.

7. “Mississippi Blood,” by Greg Iles (Morrow: $28.99). The conclusion to the politically charged Natchez Burning trilogy.

8. “In This Grave Hour,” by Jacqueline Winspear (Harper: $27.99). Investigator Maisie Dobbs is assigned to find the killer of a man who escaped Belgium as a boy during The Great War.

9. “The Idiot,” by Elif Batuman (Penguin Press: $27). A Turkish Harvard freshman develops a crush on an older mathematics student from Hungary.

10. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Double Down,” by Jeff Kinney (Abrams: $13.95). Greg and Rowley try to make a scary movie after finding an old video camera.



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