You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myStatesman.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myStatesman.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myStatesman.com.

Joe Gross’ picks for the Texas Book Festival


SATURDAY

10 a.m. The great Margaret Atwood discusses her new novel “The Heart Goes Last” with one-time Austin author Kelly Luce. Neither is a stranger to a certain degree of grounded fantasy. I am sure you can sneak in a question about “The Handmaid’s Tale.” (House Chamber)

11 a.m. Kids, it’s Lemony Snicket time. The man himself, in front of you, discussing various unfortunate events. (Paramount Theater)

Noon (11:45 p.m.) One-time Austinite Sarah Hepola discusses her long road to sobriety in her New York Times best-seller “Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget.” (Central Presbyterian Church)

1 p.m. Two memoirists, Marie Mutsuki Mockett (“Where the Dead Pause and the Japanese Say Goodbye”) and Damon Tweedy (“Black Man in a White Coat”) discuss race, grief and the weight of history. (Kirkus Reviews Tent)

2 p.m. Poets Mark Neely (“Dirty Bomb”) and Juliana Spahr (“That Winter the Wolf Came”) discuss tackling the contemporary political moment through poetry. Moderated by Heather Houser. (Capitol Extension 2.016)

3 p.m. (3:15) It is an extraordinary time for women in comics, so check out cartoonists Marisa Acocella Marchetto (“Anna Tenna”), Anne Opotowsky and illustrator Aya Morton (the Walled City Trilogy), discussing where women in comics have been and where they are going. (Capitol Auditorium)

4 p.m. Longtime Village Voice music editor Robert Christgau is a brilliant, innovative writer, and his portrait-of-the-critic-as-a-young-man memoir, “Going into the City,” is a trip. (Capitol Extension 2.010)

SUNDAY

11 a.m. Journalists Michael Weiss and Joby Warrick unwind the violent beginnings of ISIS and the future of the Islamic State in the Middle East. (C-SPAN2/Book TV Tent)

Noon (12:30 p.m.) In “Negroland,” Pulitzer Prize-winning critic and memoirist Margo Jefferson discusses growing up in the African-American upper class and how it shaped her views on race and identity. (Capitol Auditorium)

1 p.m. Dalia Azim moderates a chat between Austin-based fiction writer Louisa Hall and Pulitzer-Prize winning science writer John Markoff about the relationship between humans, computers and where the real meets unreal in the future of artificial intelligence. (C-SPAN2/Book TV Tent)

2 p.m. (2:15 p.m.) Authors Kelly Link (“Get in Trouble: Stories) and Austin’s own Edward Carey (the Iremonger series) love each other’s work. Here them discuss their oddness and each other’s. (Texas Tent)

3 p.m. Of course I am going to recommend the panel I am moderating. Austin Grossman discusses his bonkers novel “Crooked,” in which Richard Nixon confronts Lovecraftian horrors that cannot be named. (Extension 1.026)

4 p.m. (3:30 p.m.) Take your daughters to TBF! Tavi Gevinson (“Rookie”), Rebecca Serle (the Famous in Love series) and North Texas author Julie Murphy (“Dumplin’”) discuss what it is to be a young woman today. (House Chamber)


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Insight and Books

Gail Collins: Trump stays buggy
Gail Collins: Trump stays buggy

Whatever Donald Trump has, it’s spreading. We’ve got a president who makes things up — and won’t retract when he’s cornered. This week press secretary Sean Spicer followed the leader. He picked up Trump’s wiretap story and added a new exciting detail: Not only had Barack Obama bugged Trump Tower, he might have used...
Krauthammer: American democracy is not so decadent after all
Krauthammer: American democracy is not so decadent after all

Under the dark gray cloud, amid the general gloom, allow me to offer a ray of sunshine. The last two months have brought a pleasant surprise: Turns out the much feared, much predicted withering of our democratic institutions has been grossly exaggerated. The system lives. Let me explain. Donald Trump’s triumph last year was based on a frontal...
Commentary: Our schools are broken; it’s time to demand change
Commentary: Our schools are broken; it’s time to demand change

Last year, the Texas Supreme Court called our state’s school funding system awful, inadequate and basically a mess – yet still ruled that it met some minimum standard for Texas students. When I asked one legislator to explain this, he said that only three or four people in Texas understood the school finance system — and he wasn&rsquo...
Commentary: Ride-hailing shenanigans at Legislature could produce harm
Commentary: Ride-hailing shenanigans at Legislature could produce harm

A great irony is transpiring at the Texas Legislature. Some conservative legislators are asking their colleagues to throw the principle of local control overboard while also weakening public safety laws. We refer of course to the great ride-hailing legislative scam. Proposed bills would cancel the authority of local governments to regulate Uber and...
Letters to the editor: March 24, 2017
Letters to the editor: March 24, 2017

Re: March 11 letter to the editor, “Free press critical to U.S.; Trump must be rebuked.” Those defending the media recently have gotten two things right: The free press is the watchdog of the government, and its protections and duty are explicitly granted in the U.S. Constitution. But when the press becomes derelict in this duty, who is...
More Stories