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Joe Gross’ picks for the Texas Book Festival


SATURDAY

10 a.m. The great Margaret Atwood discusses her new novel “The Heart Goes Last” with one-time Austin author Kelly Luce. Neither is a stranger to a certain degree of grounded fantasy. I am sure you can sneak in a question about “The Handmaid’s Tale.” (House Chamber)

11 a.m. Kids, it’s Lemony Snicket time. The man himself, in front of you, discussing various unfortunate events. (Paramount Theater)

Noon (11:45 p.m.) One-time Austinite Sarah Hepola discusses her long road to sobriety in her New York Times best-seller “Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget.” (Central Presbyterian Church)

1 p.m. Two memoirists, Marie Mutsuki Mockett (“Where the Dead Pause and the Japanese Say Goodbye”) and Damon Tweedy (“Black Man in a White Coat”) discuss race, grief and the weight of history. (Kirkus Reviews Tent)

2 p.m. Poets Mark Neely (“Dirty Bomb”) and Juliana Spahr (“That Winter the Wolf Came”) discuss tackling the contemporary political moment through poetry. Moderated by Heather Houser. (Capitol Extension 2.016)

3 p.m. (3:15) It is an extraordinary time for women in comics, so check out cartoonists Marisa Acocella Marchetto (“Anna Tenna”), Anne Opotowsky and illustrator Aya Morton (the Walled City Trilogy), discussing where women in comics have been and where they are going. (Capitol Auditorium)

4 p.m. Longtime Village Voice music editor Robert Christgau is a brilliant, innovative writer, and his portrait-of-the-critic-as-a-young-man memoir, “Going into the City,” is a trip. (Capitol Extension 2.010)

SUNDAY

11 a.m. Journalists Michael Weiss and Joby Warrick unwind the violent beginnings of ISIS and the future of the Islamic State in the Middle East. (C-SPAN2/Book TV Tent)

Noon (12:30 p.m.) In “Negroland,” Pulitzer Prize-winning critic and memoirist Margo Jefferson discusses growing up in the African-American upper class and how it shaped her views on race and identity. (Capitol Auditorium)

1 p.m. Dalia Azim moderates a chat between Austin-based fiction writer Louisa Hall and Pulitzer-Prize winning science writer John Markoff about the relationship between humans, computers and where the real meets unreal in the future of artificial intelligence. (C-SPAN2/Book TV Tent)

2 p.m. (2:15 p.m.) Authors Kelly Link (“Get in Trouble: Stories) and Austin’s own Edward Carey (the Iremonger series) love each other’s work. Here them discuss their oddness and each other’s. (Texas Tent)

3 p.m. Of course I am going to recommend the panel I am moderating. Austin Grossman discusses his bonkers novel “Crooked,” in which Richard Nixon confronts Lovecraftian horrors that cannot be named. (Extension 1.026)

4 p.m. (3:30 p.m.) Take your daughters to TBF! Tavi Gevinson (“Rookie”), Rebecca Serle (the Famous in Love series) and North Texas author Julie Murphy (“Dumplin’”) discuss what it is to be a young woman today. (House Chamber)


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