You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myStatesman.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myStatesman.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myStatesman.com.

Print Austin celebrates art on paper with month of events


Printmakers make art for the masses — at least that’s how it seems. The medium looks more approachable than the dark arts of oil paints and conceptual art, although, it, too, can take eons of study to master.

Austin is increasingly becoming known as a respected nexus for printmaking, and the month-long Print Austin features the full range, from highly conceptual fine art prints that make leaps into sculpture, to gnarly, eye-popping gig posters for Red River clubs.

The events for Print Austin are sprinkled throughout the city at galleries, museums and oddball spots, from parties with live printing at Leona Gallery to full-fledged exhibits at Carver and Cepeda library branches and even one show at a doctor’s office. This is Print Austin’s fourth year.

“We started with 20 events and now it’s grown to 40 throughout Austin,” says Elvia Perrin, one of the organizers, as well as a noted printer. The event draws print makers, vendors and art school departments from all over the country.

This being art made in Texas, there are a few oddball events. The one sure to raise eyebrows among these is undoubtedly prints made with a steamroller.

Perrin seemed relieved to not be in charge of this event, in which Jesus De La Rosa, associate professor of art at Texas A&M in Kingsville, will be running over pre-carved woodblocks, yes, with a steamroller (there are 25 spots for artists with $35 registration each; sign up at the Print Austin website).

Here are some highlights from Print Austin 2017, which runs Jan. 15-Feb. 15 and includes a variety of affordable classes:

Miscellanea

Interdisciplinary artist Paloma Mayorga has curated a show from contemporary print artists of color, to show at a doctor’s office. Dr. Robert E. Cantu has a little space outside of his office, Perrin says, where the prints will be displayed. He catered last year, she says. “It felt a little like a fun house,” including a band crammed in the corner. (Opening reception, hosted by Dr. Cantu, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Jan. 21. Exhibit open during office hours through Feb. 18. 2911 Medical Arts Street, Bldg. 13).

Print Expo / Bin Fest / Steamroller Printing

The sprawling rabbit warren of complexes makes a stop here a no-brainer. A show by Kevin McNamee-Tweed is next door at the Museum of Human Achievement, while you can also peruse prints for sale by 30 artists, check out the Art Science gallery, Modern Rocks, artist studios and offerings from printing presses from across the country (Noon to 5 p.m. Feb. 11, RSVP through the event website for location.)

Orna Feinstein

This art shimmers and buzzes. “It makes you rethink print,” says Perrin. Orna Feinstein prints on plexiglass, and turns print into sculpture.

(Reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan. 13 at Camiba Art Gallery, 2832 E Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. #111. Exhibit continues through Feb. 11.)

The Contemporary Print

Susan Tallman juried the print competition, which narrowed down 900 entries to 34. “She’s pretty big in our world. She’s the chief editor for ‘Art and Print’ magazine, a well-read art historian, and she juried the show,” Perrin says. “So she chose from artists who hang from all over the country.” (Reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan. 20 at O2 Space at Flatbed Press Headquarters, 2832 East Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Exhibit through Feb. 18.)

Art Werger: Tidal Shift

Dreamy, photorealistic prints of both the mundane and the mundane with a hint of mystery, in stunning detail. (Reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Jan. 20 at Slugfest Workshop and Gallery. Runs through Feb. 18.)

The Art of the Print

Tucked away in a project room, for one night only, prints pulled from the Blanton Museum of Art’s extensive holdings will be on display for the public. “They actually opened up their private collection,” says Perrin. “You can get close with the magnifying glass — there’s a crazy amount of monitors who are watching you, but it’s pretty great. … You can go up to a (Francisco) Goya, and just see what an actual piece of paper, inked, looks like, instead of just a slide. So it’s a pretty rare opportunity to do that.” (5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Jan. 19, Julia Matthews Wilkinson Center for Prints and Drawings in the Blanton Museum of Art, 200 E Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.)



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Austin360

Amber Heard, Elon Musk are officially together?
Amber Heard, Elon Musk are officially together?

There’s been talk of actress Amber Heard and billionaire Elon Musk being romantically linked, but this weekend the pair made it “social media official.” >> Read more trending news Johnny Depp’s ex has hooked up with the Tesla founder, and they were caught on film together in Australia, People reported. Heard is in...
Better diet, better skin
Better diet, better skin

Can what you eat help reduce the sign of aging? Apparently so. New research finds that certain foods can help reduce the signs of aging skin, including wrinkles and dryness, according to Environmental Nutrition newsletter. Try adding these foods for a better complexion.  --Green tea: the polyphenols in green tea may help your skin by offering...
Bordeaux vintage 2016: The Medoc

This is the third and final installment of my series of columns on the exceptional 2016 vintage in Bordeaux. I saved the best for last. The Medoc, the area northwest of the city of Bordeaux toward the Atlantic Ocean, is the sweet spot of vintage 2016. Nowhere else in the vast Bordeaux region was the quality of the vintage as consistent across the board...
Best Bites: Triscuit Fig & Honey crackers
Best Bites: Triscuit Fig & Honey crackers

Some crackers are meant for snacking, some are meant for cheese. Some, like the original Triscuit, are great for both. One of Triscuit’s newest flavors, Fig & Honey, is meant for cheese. Lightly sweet, and with an even lighter hint of fig, these crackers would be superb with creamy cheeses (I had them with brie) or cheese with fruit, such as...
A Nairobi restaurant with local ingredients and a dreamy vibe
A Nairobi restaurant with local ingredients and a dreamy vibe

Harold Sena-Akoto, the Ghanaian-born chef of 45 Degrees Kitchen, learned an inspirational lesson from an Italian mentor years ago. “You know Italians,” Sena-Akoto said with a chuckle. “They are so passionate. My chef said to me: ‘Consider yourself blessed that people come to you for a meal. So imagine that every meal you cook...
More Stories