Austin360 arts list, July 28-Aug. 3


Theater & dance

“August: Osage County.” The City Theatre’s sizzling summer season heats up with the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning production about the Weston family, who all return home to the desolate plains of Oklahoma after their famous poet and patriarch father, Beverly Weston, disappears. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 13. $10-$25. 3823 Airport Blvd. citytheatreaustin.org.

“Cabaret.” At the decadent Kit Kat Club, Sally Bowles is a club regular until she meets American writer Cliff Bradshaw. Their story and the stories of those around them unfold against the backdrop of 1930s Germany. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. $17-$26. The Wimberley Playhouse, 450 Old Kyle Road, Wimberley. 512-847-0575, wimberleyplayers.org.

“A Closer Walk with Patsy Cline.” TexARTS pays tribute to a music legend who dominated the country, blues, pop and gospel charts of the 1950s and ’60s. Featuring more than 20 of Patsy Cline’s unforgettable hits, this toe-tapping, foot-stamping musical traces her career from the early days of singing in honky tonks to her triumph at Carnegie Hall. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. $40-$50. 2300 Lohman’s Spur. tex-arts.org.

“It Can’t Happen Here.” Written during the rise of fascism in Europe, Sinclair Lewis’ darkly satirical novel, adapted by Tony Taccone and Bennett S. Cohen, follows the ascent of a demagogue who becomes president of the U.S. by promising to return the country to greatness. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $15-$35. The Vortex, 2307 Manor Rd. 512-478-5282, vortexrep.org.

“The Moors.” Not sure what to expect with this Hyde Park Theatre production of Jen Silverman’s dark comedy depicting the bleak and savage moors and two sisters who live there? “The Moors” is a riff on the lives and works of 19th-century novel-writing siblings the Brontë sisters, examining love, power and our longing to be noticed. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday through Aug. 5. $20-$26. 511 W. 43rd St. hydeparktheatre.org.

“My Pool, My Park, My City: Bartholomew Swim.” The dynamic, site-specific dance group Forklift Danceworks is back with its next performance, featuring City of Austin lifeguards, aquatics maintenance staff and neighborhood residents and drawing its choreography from their everyday movements. 8 and 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Free with RSVP. Bartholomew Pool, 1800 E. 51st St. forkliftdanceworks.org.

“Rock of Ages.” This Tony Award-nominated jukebox musical takes you back to the time of big rock bands with even bigger egos and will feature hits from artists like Journey, REO Speedwagon, Pat Benatar and more. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 6. $14-$30. Georgetown Palace Theatre, 810 S. Austin Ave. 512-869-7469, georgetownpalace.com.

“The Wizard of Oz.” The summer musical season at Zilker Hillside Theatre returns with a classic. The musical, based on the book by L. Frank Baum, was Broadway’s biggest hit in 1903. The Zilker Summer Musical is one of the longest continuously running outdoor musical events in the U.S., celebrating its 59th season this year. 8:15 p.m. Thursday-Sunday through Aug. 12. Free. 2206 William Barton Drive. zilker.org.

Literary calendar

Rebecca Whitehead Munn. 7 p.m. Friday. The memoirist speaks and signs “The Gift of Goodbye.” BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-472-5050, bookpeople.com.

Charlotte Reagan. 4 p.m. Sunday. The young adult author speaks and signs “Just Juliet: A LGBTQ Love Story.” BookWoman, 5501 N. Lamar Blvd A-105. 512-472-2785, ebookwoman.com.

William R. Kelly, Robert Pitman and William Streusand. 3 p.m. Sunday. The nonfiction authors speak and sign “From Retribution to Public Safety.” BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-472-5050, bookpeople.com.

Jessica Reisman. 7 p.m. Tuesday. The science fiction writer speaks and signs “Substrate Phantoms.” BookWoman, 5501 N. Lamar Blvd A-105. 512-472-2785, ebookwoman.com.

Reavis R. Wortham and David Hansard. 7 p.m. Tuesday. The thriller writers speak and sign “Hawke’s Party” and “How the Dark Gets In.” BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-472-5050, bookpeople.com.

Art

Art for the People. “Abstract Absolutely,” “I See You” and “Scene Builders.” Art for the People present three new exhibits, the first of which showcases the relationship of color and form with a variety of Austin artists. The second feature photographs from couple Karen and Steve Jackson. And “Scene Builders” involves artist whose pieces are created on or in buildings and on bodies. 12 to 6 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday through Oct. 14. 1711 South 1st St. 512-761-4708, artforthepeoplegallery.com.

Art Science Gallery. “Far Out.” The newest art exhibit displays art inspired by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. The 22 featured artists created their pieces after visiting the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, sitting in front of the telescope. Noon to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday. 916 Springdale Road. 512-522-8278, artsciencegallery.com.

Blanton Museum. “Epic Tales from Ancient India: Paintings from the San Diego Museum of Art.” Abduction, betrayal and heroic battles: Larger-than-life stories are depicted with a delicacy of touch and vibrant colors in this collection of Indian paintings. Through Oct 1. “Teresa Hubbard/Alexander Birchler: Giant.” In their three-channel film installation, Hubbard and Birchler present a decaying movie set just outside Marfa, left behind after the 1956 filming of “Giant,” starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and James Dean. The film captures scenes from a Warner Bros. office in 1955 and the skeletal remains of the movie set today. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. $5-$9. 200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. 512-471-5482, blantonmuseum.org.

The Contemporary Austin. “Garth Weiser: Paintings, 2008-2017” and “Mark Lewis: Galveston.” Two new exhibits at the Jones Center include the first monographic museum display of Weiser’s abstract paintings. Lewis focuses on another medium entirely, making short films about the modern urban environment. Through Aug. 27. “With Liberty and Justice for All (A Work In Progress).” Jim Hodges’ multimedia exhibit, exploring the impermanence and fragility of the human experience, is on display at the Moody Rooftop at the Jones Center. Ongoing. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. $3-$5 (free on Tuesdays). 700 Congress Ave. Laguna Gloria, 3809 W. 35th St. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (gallery); 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday (grounds). 512-453-5312, thecontemporaryaustin.org.

Davis Gallery. The annual summer multi-artist show “Radiant: Group Show” focuses on radial compositions, luminescent surfaces and circular shapes to invite the audience to explore the importance of form, composition and tone. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday through Aug. 19. 837 W. Twelfth St. 512-477-4929, davisgalleryaustin.com.

De Stijl Podium for Art. “En Bola.” This exhibit at De Stijl features Austin collective Los Outsiders working in tandem with a trio of Texas artists and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by art critic Jeanne Claire van Ryzin. 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday and Saturday through Aug. 12. 1006 W. 31st St. 512-354-0868, destijlaustin.com/upcoming.

Georgetown Art Center. “The Lost Tarot” is the first exhibit of an exquisite series by Austrian-born Hans Bauer, whose images of magical realism evoke a long-lost, recently rediscovered deck of medieval imagery. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 20. 816 S. Main St., Georgetown. 512-930-2583, georgetownartcentertx.org.

Lora Reynolds Gallery. Artist Catherine Lee’s first show at the gallery, “Time,” features her sculptures and paintings, many of which speak to the core tenets of humanity and point to the human impulse of design and make (by hand) implements for farming, hunting, protection, worship or storytelling. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday through Sept. 9. 360 Nueces St. Ste. 50. 512-215-4965, lorareynolds.com.

Mexic-Arte Museum. “YLA 22: ¡Ahora!” Guest curated by Alana Coates, the Mexic-Arte show, the 22nd installment of the museum’s annual emerging Latinx artist exhibit, features eight artists from across Texas whose art confronts prominent issues of the contemporary Latino experience in the U.S. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday-Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 27. 419 Congress Ave. 512-480-9373, mexic-artemuseum.org.

North Hills Gallery. “Go West, Young Man.” Artists Lonnie Shan and Rene Wojick are two western art enthusiasts who are exploring their heritage from unique viewpoints. 10 a.m. to noon Friday and 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday. 7050 Village Center Drive. nwhillsumc.org/wp.

The People’s Gallery. 13th Annual Exhibition. The People’s Gallery in City Hall features a wide array of painting, sculpture, drawing and other media by nearly 90 artists across Central Texas. 7:45 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday through early January 2018. Austin City Hall, 301 W. Second St. Free. 512-974-7700, austintexas.gov/department/peoples-gallery.

Stephen L. Clark Gallery. “This Land: An American Portrait” celebrates the release of Jack Spencer’s new book from the University of Texas Press. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and by appointment through Aug. 5. 1101 W. Sixth St. 512-477-0828, stephenlclarkgallery.com.

Texas Folklife. “Hand-Painted Envelopes” is a new exhibit featuring envelopes that have been hand-painted from the 1930s and ’40s from five envelope artists. They are among the best-known envelope artists of the 20th century. Their work highlights a folk art tradition that dates from the 1850s in England. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday through Oct. 6. 1708 Houston St. texasfolklife.org.

Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum. “Mentoring a Muse” is the first-ever show of numerous and never-before-seen works from one-time University of Texas art student Farrah Fawcett and her mentor and professor Charles Umlauf. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through Aug. 20. 606 Robert E. Lee Road. 512-445-5582, umlaufsculpture.org.

Wally Workman Gallery. The gallery opens its first solo show with Houston-based artist Mary Case. Her work interprets organic forms — both intimate figure drawings and large abstract landscape paintings — with subtlety and spontaneity. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. 1202 W. Sixth St. 512-472-7428, wallyworkmangallery.com.

Yard Dog Art Gallery. With “Southern Folk Art From The Vaults Show,” Yard Dog Art Gallery is putting the spotlight back on some of the best pieces to find at the gallery that first established itself in Austin as a place to find well-done folk art. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 20. 1510 S. Congress Ave. 512-912-1613, yarddog.com.

Music

“I/We.” Austin Classical Guitar presents a musical journey, featuring a new work by Joseph V. Williams II exploring commonality, struggle and perseverance through stories of refugees currently settling in Central Texas. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $27-$57. Blanton Auditorium, 200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. austinclassicalguitar.org.

The Hartman Foundation’s “Concerts in the Park.” Each weekend in the summer, a different ensemble of the Austin Symphony will be featured on the front lawn of the Long Center, performing music from jazz and light classical to pops selections and film scores. 7:30 p.m. Sundays through Aug. 27. Free. The Long Center, 701 W. Riverside Drive. austinsymphony.org.



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