Vyopta’s high energy resonates with workers


The videoconferencing industry has been around for more than three decades, but it is hitting a growth phase and Austin’s Vyopta Inc. is working to capture its share of that expanding market.

The conferencing industry has grown into an mix of big vendors of relatively expensive “room systems” and emerging companies that are taking conferencing to a whole new range of video-capable devices, including laptop computers, tablets and smart phones.

Corporations and other organizations with far-flung operations are increasingly using a diverse range of videoconferencing technology to manage their businesses.

That’s where Vyopta comes in. It develops analytics software that can keep track of a diverse range of conferencing solutions and give its customers a better picture of how well things are working together and what areas need improvement.

The primary users of its software are the information technology professionals who are typically given the task of making sure videoconferencing systems are running right and delivering a return on investment.

The company is one of the “Notable Newcomers” to the American-Statesman’s 2016 Top Workplaces project.

For Devon Winegar, a software engineer who has been at the company since its early days, this is an exciting time. The software that he and his team have worked on for several years is now finding its way to plenty of new customers this year. That’s because the company has used a first round of $5 million to $6 million venture investment to build its sales and marketing teams to generate business growth.

“I feel a really great personal and emotional investment in the company,” Winegar said. “I want to make sure we continue to see the growth and success that we deserve based on all the work we have put in.”

Katey Ferenzi, a member of the marketing team who joined the company in March, says Vyopta has a balance of youthful energy and experienced management to keep things pointed in the right direction.

Ferenzi was part of a team that did a redesign of Vyopta’s website shortly after she joined the company. The result, she said, is something that engages potential customers and helps the marketing effort.

“It’s definitely not boring,” she said. “We have done exceptionally well, but we tried some things that didn’t do well and we learned from them. That learning attitude extends throughout the whole company. Everyone is eager. You get to flex your muscles and try new things.”

The company uses some of its strengths in analytics to assess which of its various new marketing and sales campaigns are generating results. Sometimes they aren’t, so changes are made.

Ferenzi said she likes the startup energy that the company has, but also the veteran leadership that is there to keep things on course.

“The leadership has been in the industry for years and they know what the company needs to do. There is a lot of mentorship going on. We have leaders who make sure we (newer workers) don’t stray too far off the path,” she said. “It is so empowering. I go home and I am proud of what I do every day. The communication within the company is huge. We have attracted those kinds of people who are willing to help and share. It is really a good group of people.”

Winegar said he likes the new energy that is coming into the company as it pushes for more growth. He describes the workplace as fun and casual, but professional.

“We still have fun at work,” he said. “We do team outings and have beers on Friday, but it is not over the top. We have a good balance” of work and play.

The big thing that motivates Winegar after eight years at the company is the sense of mission about the company, which is to make a real impact on an emerging tech industry.

“I enjoy being in the forefront of a tech culture and hopefully being disruptive” to the established market, he said. “We want to understand where this culture is going and help to shape it and help people make the best use of it.”


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