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Communication, collaboration drive BP3 Global’s workforce


Lots of businesses run well because they have good processes. They have developed a series of steps that employees should take to get various jobs done consistently and correctly, over and over again.

Businesses with good processes tend to run more smoothly.

Austin’s BP3 Global Inc. has built its company on business process management. It employs a group of consultants who work with customers to discover and refine the processes that work best for them. And it develops software to smoothly ensure those steps are followed so businesses run right.

And BP3 prides itself on running its own business right.

The company is one of the “Notable Newcomers” in this year’s American-Statesman’s Top Workplaces project.

BP3’s employees praise the company for its flexibility, for its open communications and transparency, and for the spirit of collaboration that shows up every day.

“Our culture permeates the entire company and it guides everything from the way we treat each other to the way we treat our customers,” said David Bailie, an engineering manager who runs the company’s software development operation. “Everyone wants to make our customers successful. If there are problems, we are all willing to jump in and do what is needed to make the customer successful. One of our guiding principles is: Do the right thing for our customers.”

The nine-year-old company says it has more experience deploying business process management solutions than any other. It works with financial institutions, energy companies and many others.

Bailie says BP3 gets lots of repeat customers because they prize the responsive service and support it delivers.

Some customers buy both consulting and software from the company. Others buy just the software.

One Danish brewery is an avid customer in part because it can get a rapid response when it asks for tweaks in BP3’s software products in order to assist its business.

Because BP3’s business is global, it has a consulting workforce that is international. Most everyone in the company gathers in Austin once a year for BPM (business process management) Camp, which has grown to include interested customers as well as employees.

Carmen Galicia came to the company four years ago as a consultant, but recently moved to the software development team.

“I like the fact that they care about what you would like to do and the career path you would like to follow,” she said. “They ask you and they listen to you.”

Mark Van Aken, also a software developer, asked for a received a transfer to a different kind of software work because he found it more interesting.

“It is a smaller company and that allows you to do more things,” he said. “At a bigger company you kind of feel like a cog in a machine. At BP3, there are multiple products and a real team spirit and you feel like you are a part of something. That is important to me.

Bailie has worked for several tech companies since graduating from college 25 years ago.

“I have worked for eight or 10 companies over my career. This is the best place I have worked for thus far.”


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